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Flowing water
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December 29, 2011, 08:30:27 AM
Attached is a 3d pipe, hollowed out.  It's a small piece of a much more elaborate drawing.

I'm trying to come up with the best way to represent flowing water (starting from the bottom, flowing to the top). I've tried squiggly lines, and that's "ok", but they look more like worms.

Any suggestions on how to best represent water flowing through the attached pipe?

Thx

TC 17 PRO
« Last Edit: December 29, 2011, 08:36:55 AM by Crispy »

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December 29, 2011, 08:32:30 AM
#1
Also, I will be using "Quality Rendering", so any suggestions on what transparent color rendering to use is fine..

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January 05, 2012, 04:56:05 AM
#2
Attached is a 3d pipe, hollowed out.  It's a small piece of a much more elaborate drawing.

I'm trying to come up with the best way to represent flowing water (starting from the bottom, flowing to the top). I've tried squiggly lines, and that's "ok", but they look more like worms.

Any suggestions on how to best represent water flowing through the attached pipe?

Thx

TC 17 PRO

Hi,

I have attached a couple of quick ideas, which may help.
There are a number of ways of doing this, so . . . . , you pays your money and makes your choice!

Load Pipe (1).sc into Pipe (1).twc
Load Pipe (2).sc into Pipe (2).twc

Copy/paste text, in Keyframe.txt, into Pipe (2).twc, or, select your chosen Keyframes manually.

Regards Tim
« Last Edit: September 13, 2012, 12:08:54 PM by Tim Stewart »

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You can design without engineering, but you cannot engineer without design.
Using Win 10 with Designer 2016/2017 and TurboCAD Pro. Plat. 2018/2019 + Lightworks (64-bit versions) + AnimationLab 5.2.


September 13, 2012, 01:20:28 PM
#3
Hi Tim,

I can open your files now, and I see how you've represented the flowing water with a moving cylinder rendered as blue eroded glass. Great idea, and it looks great. My problem is that I'm trying to round corners (see attached piping.tcw). Do you have any suggestions how to represent what you've done in my attachment?  I could "rail sweep" a circle through my pipe, render it blue eroded glass (or something similar), but I don't know how I would make it look like it's flowing.

Oh, FYI.. My attachment is piping that is ultimately attached to a large vessel where the water is to be distributed.

Thanks!

Chris

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September 13, 2012, 03:02:55 PM
#4
Hi Tim,

I can open your files now, and I see how you've represented the flowing water with a moving cylinder rendered as blue eroded glass. Great idea, and it looks great. My problem is that I'm trying to round corners (see attached piping.tcw). Do you have any suggestions how to represent what you've done in my attachment?  I could "rail sweep" a circle through my pipe, render it blue eroded glass (or something similar), but I don't know how I would make it look like it's flowing.

Oh, FYI.. My attachment is piping that is ultimately attached to a large vessel where the water is to be distributed.

Thanks!

Chris

ummmm! . . . well, I thought you might ask that!  ;)

Is it necessary to have sharp 90 degree turns, or, will you in fact be using all smooth radiused corner joints?

Having a, more or less, constant internal section would allow the use of a chain of rotating glass spheres perhaps (being a snug fit inside the pipe) following the neutral axis path.  I am just thinking quickly here, as it is time to do other things!

Do you really need to show the entire pipe as animated?  Using a section or two, without the direction changing joints would create a suitable illusion, and, might be easier to do?  Animated wavy arrows?

Anyway, I hope this helps.

I might try something tomorrow -  no promises.

Regards Tim

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You can design without engineering, but you cannot engineer without design.
Using Win 10 with Designer 2016/2017 and TurboCAD Pro. Plat. 2018/2019 + Lightworks (64-bit versions) + AnimationLab 5.2.


September 13, 2012, 03:29:42 PM
#5
Ohh! Large spheres, with a snug fit, might work.  And no, I don't think I need to have different corner radiuses.. They could all be rounded.
And I might not need to show the whole pipe animated.. I just want it to look as close to water flowing through it as possible.. illusion or not.

Thanks for the tips.. any other ideas you come up with would be appriciated, too! But only if you have some free time  :)

Thx!

Chris

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September 14, 2012, 03:20:26 AM
#6
Hi Chris,

I did this quickly this morning, so it is only a rough job!

You could use a cylinder of eroded glass moving along the tube (more realistic) and then morph this into a sphere/s to go round the bend.  I have not tried this yet, but I see no reason why it would not work.  There's always more than one way to skin a cat!

You might use multiple paths with small spheres/bubbles/fish!, and these too would follow your desired route and motion, as above.

Also, if you were only animating along straight sections you could use an image/photograph of water and animate this by moving the image incrementally.

How much time/life have you got?

Regards Tim
« Last Edit: September 14, 2012, 01:21:44 PM by Tim Stewart »

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You can design without engineering, but you cannot engineer without design.
Using Win 10 with Designer 2016/2017 and TurboCAD Pro. Plat. 2018/2019 + Lightworks (64-bit versions) + AnimationLab 5.2.


September 14, 2012, 11:51:25 AM
#7
Thanks Tim!

I'm gonna play with all these ideas.. See what I can come up with.

I appriciate your suggestions!

Chris

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September 14, 2012, 01:24:28 PM
#8
No problem - only you will know what you want, and, getting there can be so much fun!

Take care.

Regards Tim

Logged
You can design without engineering, but you cannot engineer without design.
Using Win 10 with Designer 2016/2017 and TurboCAD Pro. Plat. 2018/2019 + Lightworks (64-bit versions) + AnimationLab 5.2.