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Using Fog with lights
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* June 22, 2011, 05:21:00 PM
I created this model about three years ago, and at present the full version is buried somewhere on one of my old hard drives, I remember using fog and luminance lights, but have not got the foggiest how I put it all together. I have achieved good results with lighting, but have always had to put a lot of time into it, especially getting to grips with luminance lights. Anyway, to cut a long story short, is the usage of fog with lights a better method to observe the spread and boundaries of lighting in general, so much better when you can actually see the beam or point light extents while experimenting. If you have any examples or ideas that will be sufficient for a starter, please post on this thread.

See below for my early example of a pipefitter and a welder , for which I  created a robot to serve as a model.

Sorry it is a small image, but will have a look for the original in the next couple of weeks.

 

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* June 22, 2011, 08:27:16 PM
#1
Consider "Scattering Medium" Foreground with standard Spotlight(s). Be sure to enable "Scattering" in the lights' "LightWorks Specific" properties.

Henry H

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* June 23, 2011, 02:34:08 AM
#2
Consider "Scattering Medium" Foreground with standard Spotlight(s). Be sure to enable "Scattering" in the lights' "LightWorks Specific" properties.

Henry H

That is ideal for me to play around with Henry, I find that when I am lighting my C.A.D. Sculptures that I nearly always have to change the lights with every model, so actually seeing were the lights are going is a must for me. If I can see were the lights are shining instead of relying on coordinates to set them. I used to be able to write thousands of lines of trig formulae when I used to write template making programs 25 years ago, but am full to the brim and have trouble holding a phone number in my head long enough to write it down these days.

If this method works as I hope it will, then I will save a massive amount of time and head scratching.

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* June 23, 2011, 06:55:30 PM
#3
Consider "Scattering Medium" Foreground with standard Spotlight(s). Be sure to enable "Scattering" in the lights' "LightWorks Specific" properties.

Henry H

That is ideal for me to play around with Henry, I find that when I am lighting my C.A.D. Sculptures that I nearly always have to change the lights with every model, so actually seeing were the lights are going is a must for me. If I can see were the lights are shining instead of relying on coordinates to set them. I used to be able to write thousands of lines of trig formulae when I used to write template making programs 25 years ago, but am full to the brim and have trouble holding a phone number in my head long enough to write it down these days.

If this method works as I hope it will, then I will save a massive amount of time and head scratching.

If you use standard Spotlights instead of "Luminance" lights, you CAN see where they're going. And you can relocate the source and/or the target with the Edit tool.

Henry H

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* June 25, 2011, 12:44:50 PM
#4
Thanks Henry, this is going to be a big help, been working all week on my Turbocad Challenge, and keep redesigning my model, about twenty different versions so far, and still lots of smaller components to do. I am leaving the lighting until last, so hope to be able to try this out in a couple of days.

« Last Edit: June 25, 2011, 12:46:35 PM by Michael Geraghty »

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July 13, 2011, 05:25:16 PM
#5
The fog effect is very eye catching, you've inspired me to go and experiment with it.

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The CAD man
Garry Wilson
Crips-CAD Creations
TC version 20 Pro Platinum + Animation Lab