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Realistic Metal material question
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December 31, 2009, 08:13:16 AM
I have been trying for some time now to create a metal material that truly looks like something that has been turned / faced off in a lathe. I know, it is not a very good description, but anyone that has done machine work will know what I am talking about? I have thought about taking a picture of a piece I machine on a lathe at work & wrapping that, but that is not what I am trying to achieve. I want to make the material in the material editor. I know it is possible, I am just not having any luck. Any help would be greatly appreciated

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* December 31, 2009, 09:58:17 AM
#1
I have been trying for some time now to create a metal material that truly looks like something that has been turned / faced off in a lathe. I know, it is not a very good description, but anyone that has done machine work will know what I am talking about? I have thought about taking a picture of a piece I machine on a lathe at work & wrapping that, but that is not what I am trying to achieve. I want to make the material in the material editor. I know it is possible, I am just not having any luck. Any help would be greatly appreciated

If the attached image shows the effect you're after, let me know and I'll post details.

Henry H

[attachment deleted by admin]

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December 31, 2009, 10:58:56 AM
#2
I find that there isn't one setting that works for all desired instances. Each part, lighting scheme and environment usually requires it own set of data and time to experiment. However, I find that starting with a wrapped image or height map can get acceptable results, especially the latter, because one can still create any type of material where the height map just gives it the desired texture. In the attached image I used a brushed metal image (created in Photoshop by motion blurring some noise) and cylindrically wrapping it as a height map. BTW, the knurled parts are also a wrapped height map, cylindrically wrapped. I spent two hours monkeying around with this plug just trying to get it look as I envisioned. I also took it into Photoshop afterwards and applied a unsharp mask and screen blended it with a copy at 26%. I added a drop shadow, some text and a background. I have also attached the one straight out of TurboCAD to show the difference between it and the edited one.

[attachment deleted by admin]


December 31, 2009, 11:31:02 AM
#3
Both of these are examples of the effect I am looking for. If you do not mind Henry, please post your details. Thanks for the jpeg Don. I have a few metal textures. I was just trying to get the effect without "cheating" :-)

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* December 31, 2009, 11:51:51 AM
#4
Both of these are examples of the effect I am looking for. If you do not mind Henry, please post your details. Thanks for the jpeg Don. I have a few metal textures. I was just trying to get the effect without "cheating" :-)

No such thing as cheating in TCad ;-)

My method is essentially the same as Don's. I'm attaching herewith three files: "Steel Rod.tcw," the TCad drawing containing the part; "Brushed_Metal3b.jpg," the image used for the material's Pattern; and "brushed horizontal.jpg," the image used for the Texture. Before opening the .tcw, save the two .jpg's to a location of your choosing. Then open the .tcw, select the object in the drawing, open its Properties dialog to the "3D"page, and change the path for the two images (in "Pattern" and in "Texture") to your own copies of these images. Then render the .tcw in Raytrace Full mode and it should look like the image I posted earlier. (The drawing is in v16 format. Let me know if you're using a different version, and I'll post a compatible file.)

Be aware, as Don has already pointed out, that the appearance of a particular material depends upon the size and shape of the object, the illumination, the Environment, and the characteristics of other objects in your drawing -- and that a lot of trial and error might be required to get just the effect you want.

Post again if you have questions.

Henry H


[attachment deleted by admin]
« Last Edit: January 03, 2010, 08:47:34 AM by Henry Hubich »

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* January 02, 2010, 12:56:21 AM
#5
I spent two hours monkeying around with this plug just trying to get it look as I envisioned.
Wow!! Don I felt like I was the only one that taking hours to get the look.It would be great if there was some magical way the wizard just set every thing accordingly.I tried your brush swatch as I like to call it.And the results reminds me of a turning with a old High Speed Tool bit would produce cutting cold roll steel (1018)on beat up lathe I used in shop class back in the day.Thanks a lot for the setting procedures that was helpful and clear up unanswered thoughts.

W.D.

[attachment deleted by admin]
« Last Edit: January 02, 2010, 01:32:15 AM by wd »

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Even a mistake may turn out to be the one thing necessary to a worthwhile achievement Henry Ford
If I have ever made any valuable discoveries it has been owing more to patient attention than to any other talent Isaac Newton
I have not failed Ive just found 10,000 ways that won't work Thomas Edison


January 03, 2010, 05:55:43 AM
#6
Thanks for all of the4 input guys. These are all very good examples of what of the looks I am trying to achieve. I just thought that I could have done this just using the material editor. Boy was I wrong. You know, using the "chrome" preset as a starting point, no matter what "wrap" setting I used, I could not get an effect remotely similar to these. It may just be me, & my lack of knowledge of how to accurately change the settings of the materials in the editor. I have mostly used my own textures, making lots of them in Photoshop, I was just trying to accomplish my goals a different way. Well, happy new year everyone, & thanks for all of the input.

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TurboCAD user since v3
 TurboCAD on flickr || My twitter ||


* January 04, 2010, 02:35:57 AM
#7
I been doing more experimenting.I think I came up with the recipe to get the feed lines a little better.Take look see!!

[attachment deleted by admin]

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Even a mistake may turn out to be the one thing necessary to a worthwhile achievement Henry Ford
If I have ever made any valuable discoveries it has been owing more to patient attention than to any other talent Isaac Newton
I have not failed Ive just found 10,000 ways that won't work Thomas Edison