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New Guy Questions
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* December 25, 2009, 04:14:02 PM
Hey all! New to Turbocad and don't have a clue as to how to use it!

I build sawmills, logging equipment and trailers. Will I be able to use TurboCad to draw my plans or is it not intended for this purpose?

I just signed up for the free trial copy so I can see what I'm getting into before spending money on it. I had a full copy of AutoCad Release 14 (I think) at one time and never figured out how to use it. If it's as complicated as that program was, I'll just stick to drawing by hand!

Thanks in advance for any advice anyone can offer!

chaikwa.

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* December 25, 2009, 07:04:08 PM
#1
Of course you can use TC for your drawings but like any program new to you, there will be a learning curve so you can't expect it to be painless. The version you need depends on what kinds of things you want to do. There is a tutorial which comes on the disc (and I guess the downloaded version) which can get you started. The best thing to do is to start drawing some simple 2D things that are familiar to you using the help file as a guide. Of course, if you get stuck, you can always use the forum.

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* December 26, 2009, 06:13:19 AM
#2
Of course you can use TC for your drawings...
Thanks for the reply Robert!

I honestly didn't know if TC could be used for plans because all I had seen people talk about on this forum was the ' renderings' they had done. I Was beginning to think it was a program principally for creating art!

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* December 26, 2009, 07:54:45 AM
#3

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December 26, 2009, 08:06:46 AM
#4
Of course you can use TC for your drawings...
Thanks for the reply Robert!

I honestly didn't know if TC could be used for plans because all I had seen people talk about on this forum was the ' renderings' they had done. I Was beginning to think it was a program principally for creating art!

While I love using TC for 3D stuff, I have used it for 2D drawing more than anything else.  Robert's right about trying to draw something you're familiar by trying out the 2D tools.  I found it to be a fun learning experience (it's still a fun learning experience).   :)

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Josh T.
meatballrocketry.com
TC Pro 18.2 & Platinum 2016


* December 26, 2009, 01:18:44 PM
#5
Thanks for the replies!

I've been messing around with it today, but I'll tell you, it is totally foreign to me! I was able to draw a rectangle then put a circle in it, but not much else! I have the 15 day free trial and I hope I can figure it out a little better before the trial expires!

chaikwa.

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December 26, 2009, 02:43:50 PM
#6
Thanks for the replies!

I've been messing around with it today, but I'll tell you, it is totally foreign to me! I was able to draw a rectangle then put a circle in it, but not much else! I have the 15 day free trial and I hope I can figure it out a little better before the trial expires!

chaikwa.

One of the big keys to messing around in the program, other than learning the functions of the tool buttons, is the use of snaps.  You can draw a rectangle, then using the vertex snap, you can start a circle at the corner of the rectangle (or move an existing circle and snap to the corner). 

The quickest way to view snap mode buttons is to click on the Tools Palette tab (to the right of the screen) and set the top pull down menu to "Sketch".  For any button, snaps or otherwise, you'll be able to hover over any particular tool button to see what it's used for.  You'll also want to take a look at the "Modify" pull-down menu on the Tool Palette.  Good luck!  Once you start to get a feel for it, I think you'll enjoy the process. 

Most of the tools I've mentioned are available on the flyout toolbars to the left, as well, except for snaps.  There are ways to open "dockable" toolbars so you can put the snaps out in the open if you want, as well as quick keyboard shortcuts for snapping as needed, but I don't want to throw too much info at you too soon.  Most of that you'll probably be able to figure out as you go along.


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Josh T.
meatballrocketry.com
TC Pro 18.2 & Platinum 2016


* December 26, 2009, 02:58:05 PM
#7
Thanks for the replies!

I've been messing around with it today, but I'll tell you, it is totally foreign to me! I was able to draw a rectangle then put a circle in it, but not much else! I have the 15 day free trial and I hope I can figure it out a little better before the trial expires!

chaikwa.

There are a few training excercise on  www.cadcourse.net  that may give you some help.

d

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* December 27, 2009, 02:07:51 AM
#8
I've been messing around with it today, but I'll tell you, it is totally foreign to me! I was able to draw a rectangle then put a circle in it, but not much else! I have the 15 day free trial and I hope I can figure it out a little better before the trial expires!
First off, yes, TCAD can certainly be used for plans. In fact, it's a very good 2D CAD program.
Secondly, in the past couple of months I've had two friends complain that they couldn't get started with TCAD, and asked for my help. I started with the basics and after exploring some of the simply drawing tools such as lines, circles and rectangles, discovered  where the problems lay; they hadn't grasped the significance of snaps, and didn't know how to print things. 

Snaps. These let you specify features of existing entities as locations for drawing new ones. You should always use snaps whenever possible.
Here's a simple example: choose the Line tool and click anywhere on the drawing area, move the mouse anywhere else and see a line that extends from where you originally clicked,  to the mouse pointer. Click and the line is drawn. Now choose the Circle Center and Point tool, click anywhere to define the circle centre, then click somewhere else to define a point of the circumference. You now have two entities: a circle and a straight line.

Now suppose you want to draw a line from the centre of the circle to the middle of the line. You could guess at these points and click where you think they are, or you could use snaps. The quickest and easiest way of using snaps is to use SEKEs (Single Equivalent Keyboard Entries). Here's how to draw a line from the middle of the first line to the centre of the circle: choose the Line tool, move the mouse to somewhere near the middle of the first line and press the M key (upper or lower case, it doesn't matter), now move the mouse near to the circumference of the circle and press the C key. You have now drawn a line from the exact middle of the first line to the exact centre of the circle. The M key is the SEKE for the Middle Point snap, and C is for Center.  There are a number of snaps, and most of them have SEKEs. You should read up on snaps and SEKEs in the Help.

For printing, you should understand the difference between Model Space and Paper Space.
Model space is where you create your drawing, full size. Paper space is where you print from.  Although this thread http://forums.turbocad.com/index.php/topic,360.0.html is about printing to a particular scale,  the 6th post contains a tutorial about setting up and printing from paper space. You might find it useful.

I hope this helps a little.

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Gary Wooding
Win10 64-bit,
TC21.2 x64 Plat, Bld59
TC16.2 Plat, Bld54.0
TCC 3.5


* December 27, 2009, 06:28:52 AM
#9
lemel man, thanks for the simplified instructions! That's exactly what I need as I know NOTHING about this program and it IS getting a little frustrating!

I have been reading the 700+ page help pdf included with the trial software, but it in itself can be confusing because it assumes that I would know the simplest of commands, such as the snaps, which I do NOT.

Thanks again to everyone that has responded so far too! If you could humor me and keep the suggestions coming I would be greatly appreciative!

chaikwa.

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* December 28, 2009, 06:15:21 AM
#10
Hi chaikwa,
I'm pleased that that helped.
Here's another very basic feature that will help in getting started: using the Inspector Bar.
The Inspector Bar, by default, lives at the bottom left of the screen and consists of entry boxes in which you can specify certain values that should be applied to the entity being created or modified. The number of boxes is dependant on the entity.
There are two ways of getting to the boxes: click with the mouse pointer, or press the TAB key.
Once you are 'in' a box you can press TAB to go to the next one.
The attachment shows how to draw a rectangle of a specific size. First select the Rectangle tool, click a place to define a corner (you can use a Snap to place it precisely), move the mouse in the direction of the opposite corner then hit TAB. Type the required width (in the Size-A box), hit Enter, hit TAB again to get to the Size-B box and enter the required hight. You then have an exact sized rectangle.

Another useful feature is that, when in an Inspector bar box, you can press F2 to enter the calculator. You can then type a calculation and when you press Enter, the result is placed into the Inspector bar box. Once a result has been calculated it remains available until overwritten. This is useful for scaling an entity equally in several dimensions.
For example, suppose you draw something with a feature that turns out to be 21.23mm, but it should be 50.02mm.   This can easily occur if you trace an illustration, for example. In this case you would need to scale the X and Y dimensions by the ratio 50.02/21.23.  
Do this by selecting the entity, tab to the Scale-X box, hit F2 to enter the calculator, type 50.02/21.23, hit Enter and the result is put in the Scale-X box. Hit Enter, then tab to Scale-Y, hit F2 then Enter to place the same ratio into the Scale-Y, then hit Enter again.  A final Enter scales the entity in both dimensions.

One other feature that you should be aware of is that everything has properties.  If you select an entity and right-click, you get a window containing various options. Choose Properties and take a look at the things that can be controlled.

[attachment deleted by admin]
« Last Edit: December 28, 2009, 06:19:36 AM by lemel_man »

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Gary Wooding
Win10 64-bit,
TC21.2 x64 Plat, Bld59
TC16.2 Plat, Bld54.0
TCC 3.5


* December 28, 2009, 08:45:34 AM
#11

Here's a simple example: choose the Line tool and click anywhere on the drawing area, move the mouse anywhere else and see a line that extends from where you originally clicked,  to the mouse pointer. Click and the line is drawn. Now choose the Circle Center and Point tool, click anywhere to define the circle centre, then click somewhere else to define a point of the circumference. You now have two entities: a circle and a straight line.
I managed to get this much accomplished with no problem!

Here's how to draw a line from the middle of the first line to the centre of the circle: choose the Line tool, move the mouse to somewhere near the middle of the first line and press the M key (upper or lower case, it doesn't matter),
But when I tried to do this next step, I got this message;
The requested operation cannot be completed.
A Snap mode is active with no snap points within the snap aperture.
Re-try the operation with snap disabled

<sigh>

chaikwa.

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* December 28, 2009, 09:23:11 AM
#12
But when I tried to do this next step, I got this message;
The requested operation cannot be completed.
A Snap mode is active with no snap points within the snap aperture.
Re-try the operation with snap disabled

The "snap aperture" is a circle whose radius is ten pixels by default; therefore the cursor must be at least that close to the existing line when you press M to start a new line at the midpoint of the existing one. Similarly, the cursor must be within no more than ten pixels of the circumference of the existing circle (not its center) for the C snap to work.

You can make the aperture visible if you wish, and adjust its size, in the Options|Preference menu.

Henry H
« Last Edit: December 28, 2009, 09:54:50 AM by Henry Hubich »

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* December 28, 2009, 09:59:38 AM
#13
But when I tried to do this next step, I got this message;
The requested operation cannot be completed.
A Snap mode is active with no snap points within the snap aperture.
Re-try the operation with snap disabled

The "snap aperture" is a circle whose radius is ten pixels by default; therefore the cursor must be at least that close to the existing line when you press M to start a new line at the midpoint of the existing one. Similarly, the cursor must be within no more than ten pixels of the circumference of the existing circle (not its center) for the C snap to work.


You can make the aperture visible if you wish, and adjust its size, in the Options|Preference menu.

Henry H

GOT IT!

I was clicking the mouse as well as not being within the aperture when I tried to snap using SEKE's.

THANK YOU!

chaikwa.

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* December 28, 2009, 10:05:33 AM
#14

THANK YOU!

chaikwa.

You're welcome. Enjoy!

Henry H

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