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Radiuses on corners of cube
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* December 21, 2010, 06:36:27 AM
I am trying to put a 6mm radius on the 8 corners of the cube part of this part. Am using 12.5. Mike.

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December 21, 2010, 09:01:20 AM
#1
I am trying to put a 6mm radius on the 8 corners of the cube part of this part. Am using 12.5. Mike.

It worked here, I just couldn't do them all at once.

What happen when you tried?

Alan H.
« Last Edit: December 21, 2010, 09:03:24 AM by Alan H. »

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TC v12.5  platinum build 58.6 w/vista 32bit


* December 21, 2010, 11:30:57 AM
#2
I am trying to put a 6mm radius on the 8 corners of the cube part of this part. Am using 12.5. Mike.

If you want to round off ONLY the corners, try the settings shown in the attached screenshot. Click the object, drag a selection rectangle to encompass the whole thing, then click the "Finish" flag.

Henry H
« Last Edit: December 21, 2010, 11:33:57 AM by Henry Hubich »

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December 21, 2010, 11:51:21 AM
#3
If you want to round off ONLY the corners,

Thanks Henry

I mistook corners for edges.

Is that input method shown  in your screen shot available in Ver 12.  I couldn't figure out how to activate it.  I've always use the inspector bar.

Alan H.

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TC v12.5  platinum build 58.6 w/vista 32bit


* December 21, 2010, 02:06:10 PM
#4
If you want to round off ONLY the corners,

Thanks Henry

I mistook corners for edges.

Is that input method shown  in your screen shot available in Ver 12.  I couldn't figure out how to activate it.  I've always use the inspector bar.

Alan H.

The screenshot was made in v12.5. What you see IS the Inspector Bar; I always "float" it. To do that, just drag it up into the drawing and then resize with the mouse.

Henry H

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December 21, 2010, 02:49:59 PM
#5
the Inspector Bar; I always "float" it. To do that, just drag it up into the drawing and then resize with the mouse.

OK, I see, there's no bar like all the others that you drag out, but it works the same. Also, thanks for the "tip" that you always "float the inspector bar", I will definitely contemplate that.

Alan H.

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TC v12.5  platinum build 58.6 w/vista 32bit


* December 21, 2010, 06:36:54 PM
#6
Gee Henry. You sure made that look easy. Thanks. Mike.

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* December 21, 2010, 07:00:20 PM
#7
Gee Henry. You sure made that look easy. Thanks. Mike.

That one WAS easy, Mike ;-)

Henry H

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January 03, 2011, 03:22:13 PM
#8
Henry,

When you zoom into your blend, do you have a small blend on the edge where it should be sharp?

I did a similar blend, but where did that small radius come from? 

Mike...

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* January 03, 2011, 06:15:01 PM
#9
Henry,

When you zoom into your blend, do you have a small blend on the edge where it should be sharp?

I did a similar blend, but where did that small radius come from? 

Mike...

In my installation, Mike, I cannot set a zero Radius. Genie throws up a warning message if I try. I cannot leave perfectly sharp edges; best I can do is to settle for about .001" radius on the edges.

But here's a workaround for a simple object like a cube: Create a copy in the same location, smaller in each dimension by twice the minimum radius (e.g., if the original is 8" on a side and the minimum radius is .001", make the copy 7.998" on a side). Blend the original and then perform a 3D Intersect with the two. Haven't looked for a workaround with more complex objects ;-)

Henry H

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* January 03, 2011, 08:13:27 PM
#10
If a 3D polyline's drawn between opposite corners of a cube, a sphere centred at its middle point can be intersected with it to give the same sort of roundoff of corners.  You can blend the corner faces into the cube sides sequentially with a mitre vertex if needed.
« Last Edit: January 03, 2011, 08:20:57 PM by murray dickinson »

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* January 03, 2011, 08:40:16 PM
#11
If a 3D polyline's drawn between opposite corners of a cube, a sphere centred at its middle point can be intersected with it to give the same sort of roundoff of corners.  You can blend the corner faces into the cube sides sequentially with a mitre vertex if needed.

Not the same at all, but I like your method better. Looks more realistic somehow.

Henry H

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January 04, 2011, 07:54:42 AM
#12
If a 3D polyline's drawn between opposite corners of a cube, a sphere centred at its middle point can be intersected with it to give the same sort of roundoff of corners.  You can blend the corner faces into the cube sides sequentially with a mitre vertex if needed.

Wish I'd thought of that.  :(

Don Ritchie

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TC 11.2 and 17.2 Platinum


January 04, 2011, 01:26:17 PM
#13
If a 3D polyline's drawn between opposite corners of a cube, a sphere centred at its middle point can be intersected with it to give the same sort of roundoff of corners.  You can blend the corner faces into the cube sides sequentially with a mitre vertex if needed.

Isn't Centre of Extents snapping one to the other quicker?

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Julian

TC18 / 38.5 Platinum, AL5. XP, Core2 Duo E6750 OC'd 3.0Ghz, Render test: 3mins 3sec.


* January 04, 2011, 02:31:45 PM
#14
If a 3D polyline's drawn between opposite corners of a cube, a sphere centred at its middle point can be intersected with it to give the same sort of roundoff of corners.  You can blend the corner faces into the cube sides sequentially with a mitre vertex if needed.

Isn't Centre of Extents snapping one to the other quicker?

That's how I did it.

Henry H

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* January 04, 2011, 04:43:57 PM
#15
You guys are right, of course, but I was fooling about with it and realised that way's only useful with a cube and sphere.  For any other form factor, it's more useful to make a subtraction element on one corner and use mirroring to propagate it.  You've got a wider range of proportions available that way.
« Last Edit: January 04, 2011, 04:46:45 PM by murray dickinson »

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* January 04, 2011, 06:09:40 PM
#16
You guys are right, of course, but I was fooling about with it and realised that way's only useful with a cube and sphere.  For any other form factor, it's more useful to make a subtraction element on one corner and use mirroring to propagate it.  You've got a wider range of proportions available that way.

Neat.

Henry H

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* January 06, 2011, 05:13:09 AM
#17
I had a bit of a think about this, and Mike's original description is of what's called a "vertex blend" elsewhere.  It's a pretty simple concept and I'd say that TC doesn't touch it for fear of a bit of imprecision and/or irrationality and/or degeneration at the vertices of the setback, which don't exist when there's a minute blend along the adjacent edges.  Anyways, it's more or less as I described, and the picture has the formula for a subtraction element for such a blend; theoretically, anyway.
« Last Edit: January 06, 2011, 02:19:15 PM by murray dickinson »

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* January 11, 2011, 07:10:50 PM
#18
 I tried my hand with Mike's Corner Radius and I stuck with Blend Edges with a Start Radius of 0.00001mm and Offsets of 6mm.

John B.
« Last Edit: January 11, 2011, 09:44:45 PM by John B. »

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John B.
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