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Attn:- Henry (Blow Out Preventer plugging and isolation concept)
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* May 31, 2010, 09:15:59 AM
Hello Henry, as you may well be aware, there are major problems capping the BP well in the gulf. I have sent them a few suggestions already to stem the flow, but now they are going for a capping methodology. I have put together a rough draft of a plugging and isolation system, and would be glad if you would cast an eye over it. They have already decided on a method, but if that does not work, I may forward this idea.

Any other ideas from members would be welcome also.

It is only conceptual, so do not worry about spelling or drafting practices.

The first image is quite large and is intended for  download, and the second should be viewable on screen.

Mike Geraghty.
« Last Edit: May 31, 2010, 11:18:40 AM by Michael Geraghty »

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* May 31, 2010, 03:09:51 PM
#1
I appreciate the implied vote of confidence, Mike, but that's way beyond my field.

Henry H

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* May 31, 2010, 06:26:40 PM
#2
I appreciate the implied vote of confidence, Mike, but that's way beyond my field.

Henry H

Many thanks for your reply Henry, I have sent a draft copy off to BP, although I know that they have thousands of ideas already to look at. I have spent the last week watching the BP ROV robots at work, surprising how a simple job can become a major task a mile down. Very interesting watching the work going on, I did not have any proper pipe or flange sizes to work on, but by watching the video stream live, have backsolved the pipe size and flange rating. I think that they will sort out the major leak soon. The methane hydrates seem to have been the major problem, as they expand at a phenominal rate with reduction in pressure or increase in temperature. They expand to 160 times their volume almost instantly and induce a dramatic increase in velocity.

Mike Geraghty.

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* May 31, 2010, 07:07:36 PM
#3
Very interesting watching the work going on, I did not have any proper pipe or flange sizes to work on, but by watching the video stream live, have backsolved the pipe size and flange rating. I think that they will sort out the major leak soon. The methane hydrates seem to have been the major problem, as they expand at a phenominal rate with reduction in pressure or increase in temperature. They expand to 160 times their volume almost instantly and induce a dramatic increase in velocity.

Mike Geraghty.

As a matter of curiosity, Mike, what is your conclusion as to the pipe size?

Henry H

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* May 31, 2010, 07:43:36 PM
#4
Hello Henry, I have not been able to see very clearly the number of bolts on the flange on the live video feed, but was surprised as to the possible rating. I reckon it is a 12" possibly sch 40 pipe and the flange with 12 bolt holes is a 12"ansi 150 lb F.F.W.N.  (Flat Face Weld Neck). The pipe schedule, I have worked back by the width of the weld capping run. The wall thickness of sch40 is about 10.3 mm. The inclusive angle of a pipe bevel is normally about 65 degrees, with a landing edge or root face anywhere between 1.5 and 3 mm depending on whether it is tig or manual arc welded. The bolts in the flange are 7/8" and the pipe cap is about 3/4" as a visual comparrison.I called the chamfered depth about 9mm x 32.5 degree Tan  x  2 + (3mm weld gap) + weld falling outside the chamfered area as about 3mm each side.

This gave me 32.5 tan x 9 = 5.7 x 2 = 11.4mm + 3mm weld gap = 14.4mm  + 3mm weld outside chamfer on cap either side = 20.4mm overall cap width for a 12" sch40 pipe.

A weld capping run can vary from welder to welder, but this is a good average.

It will be interesting to find out, as I have been led to believe that part of the pipework is 20" FROM THE NEWS ARTICLES, MAYBE THERE IS A REDUCER SOMEWHERE ALONG THE LINE.
« Last Edit: June 01, 2010, 05:05:47 AM by Michael Geraghty »

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* May 31, 2010, 08:56:49 PM
#5
These flanges may be compact flanges Henry, and may be what is deceptive in relation to bolt holes and size.
Watch this space !.

Mike Geraghty.

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* June 01, 2010, 12:56:15 PM
#6
I have no comment on your concept Mike, but  I went to BP website. I find the use of 3D Graphics to be very informative.

http://www.bp.com/bodycopyarticle.do?categoryId=1&contentId=7052055

Technical Update Video (13 min)

http://bp.concerts.com/gom/kentwellstechupdatelong053110.htm

Maybe it has some information that you can use Mike.

Jack
« Last Edit: June 01, 2010, 01:00:18 PM by Jack Zimmer »

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* June 01, 2010, 05:11:17 PM
#7
I have no comment on your concept Mike, but  I went to BP website. I find the use of 3D Graphics to be very informative.

http://www.bp.com/bodycopyarticle.do?categoryId=1&contentId=7052055

Technical Update Video (13 min)

http://bp.concerts.com/gom/kentwellstechupdatelong053110.htm

Maybe it has some information that you can use Mike.

Jack

Many thanks for the input Jack, the video did confirm for me that the flange is a 12 hole flange, now all I have to find out is if it is a special compact flange.The kind of flange is not relevant for the use of my concept, but just curiosity.
Excellent video and great usage of graphic content.

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* June 01, 2010, 05:50:21 PM
#8
Another concept that I came up with was a heavy saddle clamp under the top flange of the BOP with a clevis and turnbuckle on both ends of the clamp which would pick up lugs on the nozzle, but have not drawn this up yet. The nozzle could then be used in conjunction with their latest method.

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* June 01, 2010, 10:58:46 PM
#9
Another concept that I came up with was a heavy saddle clamp under the top flange of the BOP with a clevis and turnbuckle on both ends of the clamp which would pick up lugs on the nozzle, but have not drawn this up yet. The nozzle could then be used in conjunction with their latest method.

I like that better. Turnbuckle might be awkward, though.

...I understand the existing pipe/flange is damaged, which could make sealing difficult.

Henry H

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* June 02, 2010, 06:23:01 PM
#10
The latest info on the pipe size is 20" , and it must be a special flange based on the number of bolt holes. My calculations above are not correct, but may be a scaled up version of the same approx calculations.

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* June 02, 2010, 09:09:53 PM
#11
The latest info on the pipe size is 20"
Yikes.

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* June 04, 2010, 08:57:10 AM
#12
They have the containment cap on now, and probably a matter of adjusting the vertical alignment of the riser to obtain the best kind of seal possible under the circumstances. This latest cap has improved the possibility for the next step, which is called and overshot tool. I designed one, but have since found out that they already have a similar device that they use. The overshot tool I assume is a two halved vessel which has an id at one end to encompass the cap body, and an id at the other end to encompass the blowout preventer pipework, with the main body of the vessel encompassing the blowout preventer flanges. The one that I designed has a 6" branch on each half with a bend and then a valve to vent the vessel as the two halves are being bolted together.

With what they have in place now, the overshot vessel idea really does have great potential.Upto the stage that they are at now, they have had to struggle, as they have not had the right criteria in relation to tools in this environment on their side or places to connect up to.


Really do hope that they go for the Overshot Tool now, if my interpretation is the same as their's of  this method.

Does anybody have any info on their Overshot Tool to compare ??.
« Last Edit: June 04, 2010, 09:07:57 AM by Michael Geraghty »

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* June 05, 2010, 05:40:12 AM
#13
Here is my rendition of the Overshot Vessel as I have interpreted it. The valves on the sides are to relieve the pressure while bolting up. I intend to put a hinge on one side with a counter balance weight, and 2 lugs on the closing side to draw flanges together before bolting.It would have bonded rubber gasket on all mating faces, or be vulcanised internally.
« Last Edit: June 05, 2010, 05:44:23 AM by Michael Geraghty »

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* July 16, 2010, 02:25:01 AM
#14
Well it seems here the game plan at below link


http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/26315908/vp=38271313&#38271313
« Last Edit: July 16, 2010, 02:27:04 AM by wd »

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