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Vee Side Table
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* May 21, 2010, 06:07:29 PM
Here is a new render of an end table design from my furniture line. This is a familiar scene I know but I have not had a chance to model any new backgrounds.
Mostly modeled in TC and rendered in Thea, this is my first render using displacement mapping( the rug) this is an amazing tool as you can create incredible textures. unlike a bump map the surface is actually displaced. lots of fun.

Best,

Steve


May 21, 2010, 07:31:18 PM
#1
Very nice Steve.

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BradE [ dean3Design ]
Core i7-3930K CPU @ 4.20GHz, 32GB 1333 DDR3, FirePro V5900
TC 21 Platinum (64-Bit) Running on Win7 Pro SP1


* May 24, 2010, 10:45:39 AM
#2
Hi Steve,

I have a policy / a general point of view, that you can ALWAYS pick someone elses work apart and try to avoid doing so to a customer. But in this case I have to give my first impressions as you state this is part of your furniture line.

I wouldn't buy it because it looks like plywood and has no cross supports for the legs at the base. I'd say makes some refinements or convince me that there is something going on that I'm missing.

How do you taper the sides? They appear thicker at the top joint and thinner at the floor. Not the depth of the piece, the thickness of the sides.

Very nice looking model and rendering.

Jack



* May 24, 2010, 05:13:49 PM
#3
Hi Jack,

It is solid wood piece and is tapered in it's thickness. This process is done with the use of a sliding sled that runs through the thickness planer. It is then finish planed by hand. The joinery in the miter is amazingly strong through hidden. I have several of these tables so I can attest to the strength. One of my influences was the Danish furniture designer Hans J Wegner, from studying his furniture up close I got to appreciate that very fine proportions of wooden furniture when built with traditional joinery can be incredibly durable. I was schooled in these methods as well. Thanks for the critical eye it is always informative to know what impression is made.

Best,

Steve


* May 24, 2010, 05:19:02 PM
#4
Here is a studio render of the table for contrast


May 24, 2010, 05:25:36 PM
#5
Here is a studio render of the table for contrast

What is used for joinery, Steve? Biscuits, dowels, splines? Something else?

I like the studio view very much.


* May 25, 2010, 12:30:13 PM
#6
Great info Steve,

I was not aware of a 'sliding sled', that definelty creates a unique look. I will also trust your strength analysis report. As the joinery is hidden it leaves doubts but a fantastic 'look'.

The newly posted image is very nice, no plywood appearance at all. If by chance you sell online, I'd be sure to use this closer view and the great discription you gave on it's strength.

I'm also pleased you took my comments so positively.  They were meant to improve your presentation, not knock your workmanship.

thanks,

Jack


May 26, 2010, 11:30:53 PM
#7
Wow.  These are impossibly good renderings !  I'm so hooked by 3D renderings, I'll just sit and stare at a great image for way too long.  Your living room image is superb.  I remember seeing a miter joint done with hidden dovetails, japanese jointery I think.  Is this something like that ?

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* May 27, 2010, 08:10:50 PM
#8
Thanks Don, Jack and Steve.
I have a few variations on the joinery, for the clean look I use biscuit joinery in combination with the long miter. I read two interesting articles in FWW lately that tested glue joints and surprisingly a plain miter tested at nearly the top of the list. the biscuit joint also tested surprisingly high. However the glue choice with this option is very important as it is primarily a glue joint. I use Tightbond three for all joinery.
I also make this table with exposed through dovetails. This is king for mechanical strength but it is an aesthetic choice to have this option.

Steve I have done hidden dovetails but the time involved is hard to justify.
Glad you like the renders check out cgarchitect.com for more render inspiration.

Best,

Steve


May 27, 2010, 08:38:35 PM
#9
OMG, I get cgarchitect's weekly email, and well, let's just say there's "room to improve" my work !  The bar keeps going up.

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