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Tcad's idea of right/left
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* March 19, 2015, 04:40:54 PM
Ok, this is going to sound silly but.........

Why does Tcad call the left side view the right side? 

Yes, when you look at an objects front its left side is on your right side but that doesn't change the fact that its the objects left side.  When you select Tcad's right side view you are in fact looking at the left side of the object.

I've been searching for some drafting standard regarding this but have yet to find anything specific.

I'm thinking it goes back to pencil and paper times, for convienance it got called the right side view because it was drawn on the right side as viewed by the drafts person or is it because you are turning the object clockwise (right hand direction)?

If I could trouble someone to enlighten me as to why this is I'd greatly appreciate it.

Matthew

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* March 19, 2015, 05:30:56 PM
#1
The identified view being what you're seeing when you're looking from YOUR left-hand side as if the model were sitting on the desk in front of you, because  the model's chirality is arbitrary.  You've determined which way it's facing and which side of it is its RH and LH, not TC, but how would you describe a sphere?  Does everybody else orient their drawings the way that you do, and think of them in your terms?  In terms of standards, perhaps the views should be identified as 1st angle, 3rd angle, whatever, but I suspect that would confuse more users than it would enlighten.   Ortho views are often defined in other apps as coordinate views, like 0,0,1 for plan view, 0,0,-1 for a bottom view, TC's LH view would be -1,0,0 because you're looking towards 0,0,0, from the negative side of the x axis.
« Last Edit: March 19, 2015, 06:13:30 PM by murray dickinson »

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* March 19, 2015, 10:07:44 PM
#2
Ok that works when you work in 2d.  Though I've never seen it as such.

Your sphere question, when working in 3d space it is supposed to be a reprsentation of real life, therefore since the software has already designated the front, back and top views and as such through the natural order of society's acceptance that when looking at the front and turn an object clockwise you are looking at its left side.  So the sphere has no front or other side but the software by its standard view presets has designated where the front and all other side will be.  Another example, you draw a car its rear bumper is at the positive Z axis coordinate and the front bumper is at the negative Z axis coordinate, when you click the front view preset you are in fact looking at the back of the car but as far as the software is concerned you are looking at the front so it is completely irrelevant how you draw your objects the software has designated views that allow you to look at all sides but reverses the right and left sides to the natural way of things, which I find very illogical if you are supposed to work in 3d space as if it is reality.

Calling the left side the right view when working in 3d space is moot because the view is not on the right side of another object or even on a persons right side when looking at it there is just one object's left side view in the centre.(not counting a viewport insertion)

This is an oddity to me, though I guess the answer to my question is that society has accepted that the positive sides of the xyz coordinate system represents the right,top, and front thereby putting the right opposite to its natural position when referenced to the front.

Matthew

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* March 19, 2015, 10:18:18 PM
#3
Okay, another way of understanding it is in meteorology, and as in the way that the isometric views are expressed.  A sou'westerly wind is a wind that blows FROM the south-west......it doesn't have anything to do with what the wind's blowing at....

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March 20, 2015, 05:05:57 AM
#4
Hi Mathew,

If you render your drawing it starts to make sense, in wire frame its pretty confusing.

HTH

Best Regards
Bob

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March 20, 2015, 04:40:21 PM
#5
I believe 3rd angle is conventional in U.S.A.  Does ISO SO 128-30:2001 give preference between 1st and 3rd?  Which is conventional other than in U.S.A., for example, Europe, Australia, ...

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