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Off-Topic - Collider
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November 21, 2009, 09:19:35 AM
Have you guys seen this? It must have cost a gazillion dollars to construct. Anyone care to try drawing a section of it with TurboCAD? :-)

http://www.boston.com/bigpicture/2009/11/large_hadron_collider_ready_to.html


* November 21, 2009, 09:38:52 AM
#1
Mind-boggling. I'd love to have been involved in the design/construction of that thing -- not that I know the first thing about such technology :-(

Henry H
« Last Edit: November 21, 2009, 11:26:04 AM by Henry Hubich »

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November 21, 2009, 09:59:49 AM
#2
Yes, impressive, but what will we really get out of it?

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* November 21, 2009, 11:20:15 AM
#3
Have you guys seen this? It must have cost a gazillion dollars to construct. Anyone care to try drawing a section of it with TurboCAD? :-)

http://www.boston.com/bigpicture/2009/11/large_hadron_collider_ready_to.html


Here is a link for the plans Don, I had a look last year, although there have been upgrades since then.

http://www.symmetrymagazine.org/breaking/2008/08/25/free-online-full-documentation-for-the-large-hadron-collider/

This Link for details :-  http://gizmodo.com/5041973/build-your-own-large-hadron-collider-in-162-x-1028-easy-steps


Mike Geraghty.
« Last Edit: November 21, 2009, 11:26:43 AM by Michael Geraghty »

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* November 21, 2009, 05:26:20 PM
#4
Yes, impressive, but what will we really get out of it?

Steve, I went to school in Dunedin with a guy who's now a scientific director of the Los Alamos National Labs in New Mexico.  He was recruited from a university in the UK on the strength of a project that got rubidium atoms almost stationary in a magnetic well, cooled by slowing their spin with differential lasers, forming something called a Bose-Einstein condensate, just a few billionths of a degree above absolute zero.  Although he got them coolest, he didn't do it first, so missed out on the Nobel.  One of the things you can do with a BEC is configure it as the most sensitive accelerometer imaginable using wave emission interferometry and measuring phase differentials.  I hope they're not overlooking cooling beer quickly.  They're using the research results to design mechanisms for the future that will see ultrasensitive sensors like that built onto a 2mm square component.  Tools like the LHC make things like that possible.


Oh, black holes and antimatter too.   Although "getting them out of it" probably isn't what's going to happen...

BTW, anybody note the look on the face of the guy driving the little tow truck in pic 8 of the Boston.com series?  "What did anyone expect?  The microwave oven in the lunch room doesn't work either...."
« Last Edit: November 21, 2009, 08:03:22 PM by murray dickinson »

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