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Turbo Talk => Gallery => Topic started by: Brad Easterday on October 24, 2010, 09:40:37 PM

Title: Watercolor(ish) Rendering
Post by: Brad Easterday on October 24, 2010, 09:40:37 PM
I've been working on a new rendering style for our homes this weekend and the attached image is what I've ended up with. I used TurboCAD, SketchUp and Photoshop to get the drawing to this point. Your critiques are welcome.
Title: Re: Watercolor(ish) Rendering
Post by: wd on October 25, 2010, 01:34:20 AM
Very nice.Is that your home?
Title: Re: Watercolor(ish) Rendering
Post by: Rob Figee on October 25, 2010, 01:44:43 AM
Great, Brad. I've been messing around with the Photoshop Watercolor filter some time ago, but you really made it work.
It certainly is very usefull to get the technical feel out of a straight forward elevation.

Rob
Title: Re: Watercolor(ish) Rendering
Post by: Carroll P on October 25, 2010, 06:48:13 AM
Great render, It looks to me like it would make a great picture for a opening presentation or cover for pamphlet.  :) lefthander
Title: Re: Watercolor(ish) Rendering
Post by: AE on October 25, 2010, 07:50:13 AM
I've been working on a new rendering style for our homes this weekend and the attached image is what I've ended up with. I used TurboCAD, SketchUp and Photoshop to get the drawing to this point. Your critiques are welcome.

Remarkable work Brad. The water colour effect is graphically quite true. The lines around the foreground trees are somewhat of a deterrent for me. Thanks for sharing your work again.  -  Al
Title: Re: Watercolor(ish) Rendering
Post by: Richard on October 25, 2010, 10:31:06 AM
Nice effect, Brad. There has been a lot of discussion and sharing of technique over at the sketchucation forums in regards to the watercolor effect.
Title: Re: Watercolor(ish) Rendering
Post by: Brad Easterday on October 25, 2010, 11:18:08 AM
Very nice.Is that your home?

Thanks all, for your comments.

WD: This isn't my personal home, but one that we are building for a local couple.

Al: I wondered how folks would feel about the sketching around the foreground trees. Something I don't care for in our current rendering style is that the landscaping is so brightly colored that it really over takes the house visually. I wanted to somewhat mute the foreground trees and even more so the background trees to add more focus on the house. The difference between the two is subtle, so I added the sketchy lines to help break the foreground and background elements apart. I appreciate your input.

Richard: I did poke around a bit in the sketchucation forums during this exercise.  :)
Title: Re: Watercolor(ish) Rendering
Post by: Richard on October 25, 2010, 11:45:27 AM
Brad, I would like to hear about your workflow. What part of the process did you use TurboCAD & SketchUp? Thanks.
Title: Re: Watercolor(ish) Rendering
Post by: Brad Easterday on October 25, 2010, 01:05:25 PM
Brad, I would like to hear about your workflow. What part of the process did you use TurboCAD & SketchUp? Thanks.

I generally model in either TC or SketchUp and sometimes both. I find there are times when it's much simpler to accomplish something in one versus the other. I love the current compatibility between the two.

This time, the modeling was done in SketchUp only. I applied the materials in SketchUp and saved (2) 2D images. One containing the textures, shadows and environment with no edges, and one containing nothing but edges with jaggies and extensions turned on (black lines on a white background).

In Photoshop I used a combination of filters on the texture layer to get the watercolor effect. First was "Ripple" (Medium, 50%). I made 2 copies of the result and filtered one with "Dry Brush" and the other with "Watercolor". I adjusted the opacity of those over the "Ripple" effect to get the right mix.

TurboCAD's task on this one was to render some soft shadows. They are most noticeable in the eves and through the entry court. On it's own, SketchUp doesn't provide any gradient to the these areas, so they end up looking rather flat and monotonous once you go to work on the watercolor effects. I tried to render the soft shadows within SketchUp using Renditioner, but the settings had to be cranked up to get the result I was after and the rendering time was not good. So, I switched over to TC and got what I needed in about five minutes. I adjusted the shadows to taste using "Levels" and added some grain, then blended using "Multiply".

Now for the line work. I like to filter the line work in Photoshop with "Diffuse Glow". It gives the lines a grainy quality that mimics pencil lines when blended using "Multiply". Adjusting the opacity lets you fine tune the effect.

The final step was to create a paper texture layer and blend it over the other layers using "Hard Light".

Hopefully this all makes sense.
Title: Re: Watercolor(ish) Rendering
Post by: Alan H. on October 25, 2010, 04:13:13 PM
Brad, I would like to hear about your workflow. What part of the process did you use TurboCAD & SketchUp? Thanks.

I generally model in either TC or SketchUp and sometimes both. I find there are times when it's much simpler to accomplish something in one versus the other. I love the current compatibility between the two.

This time, the modeling was done in SketchUp only. I applied the materials in SketchUp and saved (2) 2D images. One containing the textures, shadows and environment with no edges, and one containing nothing but edges with jaggies and extensions turned on (black lines on a white background).

In Photoshop I used a combination of filters on the texture layer to get the watercolor effect. First was "Ripple" (Medium, 50%). I made 2 copies of the result and filtered one with "Dry Brush" and the other with "Watercolor". I adjusted the opacity of those over the "Ripple" effect to get the right mix.

TurboCAD's task on this one was to render some soft shadows. They are most noticeable in the eves and through the entry court. On it's own, SketchUp doesn't provide any gradient to the these areas, so they end up looking rather flat and monotonous once you go to work on the watercolor effects. I tried to render the soft shadows within SketchUp using Renditioner, but the settings had to be cranked up to get the result I was after and the rendering time was not good. So, I switched over to TC and got what I needed in about five minutes. I adjusted the shadows to taste using "Levels" and added some grain, then blended using "Multiply".

Now for the line work. I like to filter the line work in Photoshop with "Diffuse Glow". It gives the lines a grainy quality that mimics pencil lines when blended using "Multiply". Adjusting the opacity lets you fine tune the effect.

The final step was to create a paper texture layer and blend it over the other layers using "Hard Light".

Hopefully this all makes sense.

RE:Hopefully this all makes sense.
OK, I can make sense (theoretically) of what you did......

But..........  Seriously, how do you learn this stuff?  Trial and error, I really doubt it was from reading the Manual.

Superb, this is more like art, there's even textures on the paper!!!  If only I..............  Well someday.....

Thanks for posting

Alan H
Title: Re: Watercolor(ish) Rendering
Post by: Brad Easterday on October 25, 2010, 10:01:17 PM
re: Seriously, how do you learn this stuff?

1 Part - mental picture
1 Part - surfing the web & books
2 Parts - admiring what others have accomplished
4 Parts - trial & error

Mix well and simmer. :)

Thanks Alan.
Title: Re: Watercolor(ish) Rendering
Post by: Darrel Durose on October 26, 2010, 04:00:20 AM
Wow - love it Brad.....

Yeah - I agree with you on how we accomplish what we do.......more trial than error, tweaking settings....

Advanced rendering has so many variables.........I do many small test renders until I am "sort of" happy with render time versus quality.....

Brad have you got any interior setups for your SOFTBOX (HDRI) software for us to try?

Daz.
Title: Re: Watercolor(ish) Rendering
Post by: Brad Easterday on October 26, 2010, 07:20:57 AM
re: Brad have you got any interior setups for your SOFTBOX (HDRI) software for us to try?

I'm almost happy with the test scene results...
Title: Re: Watercolor(ish) Rendering
Post by: Darrel Durose on October 26, 2010, 08:23:18 AM
Nice one....
could you post your results Brad?

Daz.
Title: Re: Watercolor(ish) Rendering
Post by: Richard on October 26, 2010, 09:56:28 AM
Thanks, Brad for the details.
Title: Re: Watercolor(ish) Rendering
Post by: Alan H. on October 26, 2010, 10:25:52 AM
1 Part - mental picture
1 Part - surfing the web & books
2 Parts - admiring what others have accomplished
4 Parts - trial & error

Mix well and simmer. :)

Thanks For The Insight ;D, I kind of suspected the trial and error....  :o

Alan H.
Title: Re: Watercolor(ish) Rendering
Post by: sgedesigns on October 26, 2010, 02:01:09 PM
Hmmm, so even at your skill level, it's still 50% trial and error . . . actually that's kind of encouraging ! ;D
Title: Re: Watercolor(ish) Rendering
Post by: DTTurbocad on October 27, 2010, 01:18:01 PM
classy rendering, great job Brad.
Title: Re: Watercolor(ish) Rendering
Post by: Don Cheke on October 27, 2010, 01:36:18 PM
Beautiful job on this one Brad. Your work is always so pleasing.
Title: Re: Watercolor(ish) Rendering
Post by: Hammer on October 27, 2010, 09:17:25 PM
Brad I absolutely love this one! Really nice when the approach is more then just a photo real image.
Title: Re: Watercolor(ish) Rendering
Post by: Brad Easterday on November 23, 2010, 02:08:57 PM
I've tweaked my process a bit and I think I'm now happy with it. I was somewhat lost on how to keep the window idea going, and at the same time remove some emphasis from them. The "Crosswater-B" image illustrates my fix. I made the simulated reflections more abstract, added some color variation and brushed them on using diagonal strokes.

The heavy lifting for modeling was done in TC for these two. Once you have a few styles setup, walls and windows can be done very quickly in TC. Hipped roofs are fast as well. I'm still deciding whether TC or SU is more efficient with gable roofs though. The benefit to using TC is the ability to edit the roof component. That being said, I end up exploding them most of the time when modeling complex roofs.
Title: Re: Watercolor(ish) Rendering
Post by: TomCozzens on November 23, 2010, 02:48:06 PM
Brad,

Very nice indeed.  The use of simulated painting is very elegant and classy.  More like artwork than a technical representation.
Title: Re: Watercolor(ish) Rendering
Post by: Don Ritchie on November 23, 2010, 03:48:40 PM
 Brad:
      Oh yeah!!!! That is really impressive.

Don Ritchie
Title: Re: Watercolor(ish) Rendering
Post by: Don Cheke on November 23, 2010, 04:07:59 PM
Gorgeous illustrations Brad. I bet the outfit you work for are glad they discovered you.
Title: Re: Watercolor(ish) Rendering
Post by: dedmin on November 23, 2010, 11:59:22 PM
You can check this - http://www.fotosketcher.com/ (http://www.fotosketcher.com/)
Title: Re: Watercolor(ish) Rendering
Post by: wd on November 24, 2010, 02:17:38 PM
As usual Brad you create impressive masterpieces.
Title: Re: Watercolor(ish) Rendering
Post by: Brad Easterday on November 24, 2010, 08:36:38 PM
Thanks again guys, for your comments. We are undergoing a new cycle of product development now and will be designing three different elevations for each of our models. I hope I can keep up. :)
Title: Re: Watercolor(ish) Rendering
Post by: wd on November 26, 2010, 11:25:26 AM
You can check this - http://www.fotosketcher.com/ (http://www.fotosketcher.com/)
It works nicely.Thanks for sharing the link.Is helpful :)
Enclose sample pics work out pretty good for a first crack at it!
Title: Re: Watercolor(ish) Rendering
Post by: Hammer on November 27, 2010, 07:56:35 PM
Brad, That is exactly what I would want to see as a client!! So impressive! I think artistic presentations like this do much more to sell an idea then a standard photoreal visualization. You have me thinking.

Best,

Steve