TurboCAD Forums

Turbo Talk => Problems => Topic started by: Darryl W on November 06, 2019, 01:43:01 PM

Title: Convert to smesh Level 4
Post by: Darryl W on November 06, 2019, 01:43:01 PM
Attached a simple bmw file and Id like to convert the entire body to a smesh level 4 so that I can try and get a nice render, so genie is taking forever to create a level 4 smesh even on the sliced right front fender. Why?

Title: Re: Convert to smesh Level 4
Post by: Dean on November 06, 2019, 05:31:23 PM
Forget smesh, Mate  ;D
smesh is good for golf balls and lightbulbs, even those with  high smooth levels can be very very slow.
Turbo is not a subd polygon modeler. i really don't know why they have the smesh tool cuz turbo doesn't like a lot of facets and nodes. :P
Maybe if you have a $10,000 dollar rig it might work faster ::)

One thing you could try for a smoother model for rendering is to get the original file in obj format, not turbo obj format.
Turbo has updated the obj import with an "add smoothness" option.This does work very well.
Title: Re: Convert to smesh Level 4
Post by: Tim Stewart on November 07, 2019, 02:40:31 AM
Attached a simple bmw file and Id like to convert the entire body to a smesh level 4 so that I can try and get a nice render, so genie is taking forever to create a level 4 smesh even on the sliced right front fender. Why?

Daz,

this is simply not TC's forte!   :(

If you're really serious, in these type of organic objects, then get yourself a copy of Rhino 3D.
In my experience, this program works well alongside TurboCAD.

Just my $0.02.

Regards Tim
Title: Re: Convert to smesh Level 4
Post by: murray dickinson on November 07, 2019, 09:05:02 PM
Catmull-Clark subdivision, which TC and most specialised subD modellers use, raises facet count exponentially.  A smesh sphere with 14 x 14 divisions, 196 faces, blows out to 44.8K faces at level 4 smoothness.  TC isn't like specialised subD modellers because it's got a CAD kernel, with a processing overhead that pure mesh subD modellers don't have.  SW has a Modo plugin, you don't build entire models with it, you use it to create dress faces.  The criteria for a subD mesh in mechanical CAD is that it looks smooth if the resolution of the mesh is below the resolution of the machine being used to produce it, so you'll use a different smoothness level to suit the scale of the object.  That's also hugely ignored in rendering: what's the resolution of your render going to be?  Print or online representation?  96 d.p.i used to be regarded as "web" resolution, but with 4K screens showing up on laptops, that's not going to be pretty.
There are plenty of free subD modellers that will subdivide an object quickly if you want to test whether that'll give you a better render.  Blender, which is such a subD modeller,  has two rendering engines, and one of those, Cycles, is also built into Rhino and Poser as their native renderer, although you can throw money at VRay and Flamingo and plenty other renderers, too.     
Title: Re: Convert to smesh Level 4
Post by: Darrel Durose on November 08, 2019, 05:18:34 AM
Darryl

Quite an easy fix really.

It's that most of the meshes facet normals are facing the wrong way (RedSDK "Show Normals" highlights this with more of the pins red and pointing inward).

Use "Surface Simplification" set to 100% to correct this then Smesh it just with Level 1... see attached
Title: Re: Convert to smesh Level 4
Post by: Alvin Gregorio on November 08, 2019, 06:03:43 AM
Just following along...  I don't work with SMeshes; just play with them every once in a while.

I thought Darrel's Level 1 render looked pretty good-- reminded me of my aging BMW in my garage.

There's a ton of information on SMeshes in the Help (http://doc.imsidesign.com/articles/#!turbocad-2019-user-guide-publication/smooth-mesh-smesh/q/smesh/qid/61350/qp/1).  For organic shapes in TurboCAD, this feature seems that it can be useful.
Title: Re: Convert to smesh Level 4
Post by: Dean on November 08, 2019, 09:21:55 AM
Another method for a "workaround" Turbo's quirks is > perhaps a little easier..
you can also save the original car body as an dxf > close it then re-open it. The normals should be correct and it should be reported as a smesh then set it at level 1.
Doing it this way keeps the original grid mesh and the surface eval displays smoother = perhaps better reflections.
Working with the dxf Turbo was about 50% more responsive than using Daz's method BUT it doesn't rule out turbo's very very slow UI when working with smesh at high levels.
Title: Re: Convert to smesh Level 4
Post by: Darryl W on November 08, 2019, 02:43:34 PM
Really useful feedback guys thanks so much for taking the time to look. Darrel I like your advice on alternate ways to demo what can be done in tcw, so thanks. Dean your advice is most welcome thanks mate, whod have known that the simple answer was to save to dxf.

In between a couple of paid jobs I downloaded a blender tutorial on car modeling with a view to doing all the basic shell model in blender then porting that work into turbocad and to see if I could conjure up a somewhat similar model. So now I can move forward with the model and transfer more data across and refine the designs. 😜