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Documentation for TCC online anywhere?
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May 14, 2009, 08:48:51 AM
Is the documentation for TCC online anywhere? Anyone have a link?  ???

Mike...

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* May 14, 2009, 09:05:24 AM
#1
Hi Mike
I haven't seen much of any kind links out there that is useful.Most of the ones I have seen is nothing more than bellyaching about TCC. There not much at CNCZone.Its kinda a dead horse.Let me know if you find something I would be interested to read something new.If your after manual Dave posted one back in the old forum.Maybe get touch with him.It is pdf.format.

W.D.
« Last Edit: May 14, 2009, 09:20:11 AM by wd »

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Even a mistake may turn out to be the one thing necessary to a worthwhile achievement Henry Ford
If I have ever made any valuable discoveries it has been owing more to patient attention than to any other talent Isaac Newton
I have not failed Ive just found 10,000 ways that won't work Thomas Edison


May 14, 2009, 02:00:18 PM
#2
I will say that the manual is very basic. I am learning as I go. I do not know if the manual that came on the CD is in PDF format. If it is I will upload it this evening after work.

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* May 14, 2009, 02:35:46 PM
#3
Another thing comes to mind you might want look into is cadcourse's demos videos.They where made back around Ver.11.But are still helpful.There should be Tutorials toward the end of the owners manual that get you started.



<A HREF="http://www.cadcourse.net/index.asp?PageAction=VIEWPROD&ProdID=36 ">Demo Link [/url][/color]

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Even a mistake may turn out to be the one thing necessary to a worthwhile achievement Henry Ford
If I have ever made any valuable discoveries it has been owing more to patient attention than to any other talent Isaac Newton
I have not failed Ive just found 10,000 ways that won't work Thomas Edison


May 15, 2009, 05:53:10 PM
#4
I loaded up TCC last night and played with it for a few minutes.

It seems easy enough. I was able to virtually mill a pocket and do some side milling. I ran a simulation and that worked fine.

But it's basically a 2D CAM program. If you are doing your work in 3D, you will have to recreate it in 2D before you can use TCC.

Mike...

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* May 15, 2009, 09:16:04 PM
#5
3D models don't have to be recreated in 2D, but they do have to be oriented to eliminate undercuts, and often broken up into more than one piece to reach everything.  I use the code that TCC produces as a start, and I learned enough about manual coding and editing to introduce z-axis strategies.   My own homebuilt router/miller has a fourth axis that isn't powered, but has a y-axis 90 degree index, so I run one file, reorient the model about the datum axis, then generate more code.  I can deal with many undercuts that way.  Toolpaths generated by TCC are 2/2.5D, but judicious manual editing goes a long way.  TCC's visual feedback of an edited code file shows me what I've done to the toolpaths relative to my model, which gives me more confidence.  At the time I bought it, there was nothing with the same sort of CAD capability integrated with CAM at the price level.  I bought TCC 2 back in the days of TC V10, and subsequently TCC3, which I haven't had the need to go beyond.  I'm a drafter/modeler, not a machinist, but I was able to amortise the investment in program and machinery quickly, machining prototypes and casting masters.   I learned a lot and got more capability at no cost, in other words.   Professional machinists probably have more sophisticated needs than me, but for this amateur, it was a good buy. 
« Last Edit: May 15, 2009, 09:18:58 PM by murray dickinson »

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May 16, 2009, 03:49:25 AM
#6
Hey Murray,

Got a picture of your 4th axis?

I am thinking about building another homemade machine, with a powered 4th axis.

Like you, I am a designer/solid modeler, and not a machinist. So the machining stuff is more challenging.

Mike...

P.S. Here is my first homemade CNC router...

[attachment deleted by admin]

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* May 16, 2009, 08:49:32 AM
#7
Great lookin starter router Mike

They have some homemade models at rockcliff I think that work great on top of my living room coffee table that will give something for the wife to complain about.Also notice they're do something for a lathe that might take TCC to task in the future when put they plans together.You may have bump into this link before.Thanks for sharing Im always interested seeing new projects the members turn up.


<A HREF="http://www.rockcliffmachine.com/index.htm ">Router link[/url]
« Last Edit: May 16, 2009, 08:55:01 AM by wd »

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Even a mistake may turn out to be the one thing necessary to a worthwhile achievement Henry Ford
If I have ever made any valuable discoveries it has been owing more to patient attention than to any other talent Isaac Newton
I have not failed Ive just found 10,000 ways that won't work Thomas Edison


* May 17, 2009, 07:43:51 PM
#8
Hey Murray,

Got a picture of your 4th axis?

I am thinking about building another homemade machine, with a powered 4th axis.

Like you, I am a designer/solid modeler, and not a machinist. So the machining stuff is more challenging.

Mike...

P.S. Here is my first homemade CNC router...


Nice job, Mike.  I'll dig up mine this week and post. I'm building another head from an air powered 1/8" die grinder.  I won't be using air, but the collet body is much better than most of the rotary tool/Dremel items, with two substantial ball bearings that're rated to be running up to 50K rpm.  I'll take the air motor's vanes out of it and couple a flex drive to it.  The body is a 15.5mm anodised tube, so dead easy to mount accurately, and you can get them for about 15 USD.  Almost disposable.  I love a deal. 

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