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Poor man's threads
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* December 17, 2010, 07:42:58 PM
Deluxe doesn't have thread maker, but you can approximate the process. You probably couldn't actually build to this, but most people don't want to lathe their own bolts.

Start by using the calculator to find the reciprocal of your thread pitch. For instance, for a #10-24 bolt the pitch is 24 so the reciprocal is 1/24 = 0.0416667. Copy this value.

Next create a wire half-model of your bolt blank.



While you're at it, at the bottom corner attach a small circle, giving it a diameter the same as the value you previously copied:



Use the revolve tool on the wire half-model to make your bolt blank. Now you have a very dull nail ;-) Next revolve the small circle using the same axis as for the blank. You will temporarily have a torus:



Click on the torus and open its properties. Click on Revolution Shape. In the Spiral Pitch field, paste again the value you previously copied. This will ungray the "Number of Coils" field. Paste a number into the NOC fields that will copy the coil all the way up your blank. For instance, if your blank is one inch tall, and designed for 10-24, then you will need 24 coils to make it all the way up. Easiest way is just to play with the numbers until it looks right. Note that there is some limit to the number of coils you can create. Now it will look something like:



Now just 3D subtract the coils from the blank, add material color, and voila! You've got threads:




« Last Edit: December 17, 2010, 07:50:08 PM by MarkS »

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* December 18, 2010, 05:10:32 AM
#1
Something else that works pretty nice is the revolve process.I use this process when have large assemblages with multiple screws in the drawing,i find creating threads with other TC thread tools consumes a lot cpu usage in the rendering process and take while complete.With the revolve process complete the rendering is quicker,I guess the thread tools are ok if is only few bolts or screws but I have couple dozen or so it can be lengthy time process.Another feature with the torus tool is some really cool springs can be done with.
« Last Edit: December 18, 2010, 05:15:56 AM by wd »

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December 18, 2010, 05:15:39 AM
#2
Thank for the tips, both work well and I'm sure to use them.

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* December 19, 2010, 04:27:14 AM
#3
 I have been looking for an alternate way of making bolts. Thanks MarkS.

 However, I make them alot like WD as I dont like the rendering time just for bolts and nuts as most drawings arent made towards those anyways, so I make them as generic as possible.

 However, I like MarkS style as sometimes I need to show a specific bolt that needs to be cut down and those I try to be as precise as possible. (Only reason I make a drawing is sometimes it might be a month or so before it gets to the floor for them to cut to length.)

 Sometimes with my version of TC, my thread tool sometimes work and sometimes dont. ERRRR very aggrevating.

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* December 19, 2010, 04:08:34 PM
#4
Technically, wd's approach isn't a thread.  ;)

But I get it about saving CPU cycles, and it makes sense that in most applications no one is going to care if the threads are real.

So I tried it. But I had a terrible time creating the profile to be used for the thread. It took me several times over the time it took with my coil technique.

My problem was that I didn't know an effective means to put together the "teeth". What I did was to create one tooth from two lines and then attempted to do a linear copy. Then I tried to poly-join them into one polyline. Unfortunately, the linear copy slightly misaligns the pieces, and they wouldn't join all up. Then I tried to copy them by hand, copying each partial triangle at the same reference point. But even this wouldn't join them up well enough for the poly-join. Finally I  used the polychain tool to link them, and that worked. But with 57 threads, it took awhile to run the chain all the way up (that would be like 114 clicks!).

So what would be the best practice approach for making those teeth if you have more than 20 of them?

Thanks!
Mark

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December 19, 2010, 07:19:27 PM
#5
As you're only creating a thread representation, a simple 1x2 grid polyline takes seconds

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Julian

TC18 / 38.5 Platinum, AL5. XP, Core2 Duo E6750 OC'd 3.0Ghz, Render test: 3mins 3sec.


* December 19, 2010, 08:28:14 PM
#6
Mark

You're over killing the methodology process of making the thread this technique been around since earlier versions.

« Last Edit: April 08, 2011, 01:36:52 AM by wd »

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Even a mistake may turn out to be the one thing necessary to a worthwhile achievement Henry Ford
If I have ever made any valuable discoveries it has been owing more to patient attention than to any other talent Isaac Newton
I have not failed Ive just found 10,000 ways that won't work Thomas Edison


* December 19, 2010, 08:35:35 PM
#7
Technically, wd's approach isn't a thread.  ;)

But I get it about saving CPU cycles, and it makes sense that in most applications no one is going to care if the threads are real.

So I tried it. But I had a terrible time creating the profile to be used for the thread. It took me several times over the time it took with my coil technique.

My problem was that I didn't know an effective means to put together the "teeth". What I did was to create one tooth from two lines and then attempted to do a linear copy. Then I tried to poly-join them into one polyline. Unfortunately, the linear copy slightly misaligns the pieces, and they wouldn't join all up. Then I tried to copy them by hand, copying each partial triangle at the same reference point. But even this wouldn't join them up well enough for the poly-join. Finally I  used the polychain tool to link them, and that worked. But with 57 threads, it took awhile to run the chain all the way up (that would be like 114 clicks!).

So what would be the best practice approach for making those teeth if you have more than 20 of them?

Thanks!
Mark


Linear Copy shouldn't misalign the parts. And it's not necessary to join them into a single Polyline; instead, enable "Use compound profile" when Revolving.

Attached screenshot shows three different methods of representing threads in a rendering. #1 is a true 3D helical thread; #2 is a "Wrapped height map" Texture applied to a smooth cylindrical surface; #3 is a Revolved profile such as we've been discussing here. #2 renders most quickly and results in the smallest file size, but its appearance isn't as nice as the other two. #1, the true helical thread, is by far the slowest to render and the most resource-hungry.

Henry H

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* December 19, 2010, 08:49:58 PM
#8
Nice chrome look  H.O.H

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Even a mistake may turn out to be the one thing necessary to a worthwhile achievement Henry Ford
If I have ever made any valuable discoveries it has been owing more to patient attention than to any other talent Isaac Newton
I have not failed Ive just found 10,000 ways that won't work Thomas Edison


December 19, 2010, 11:45:50 PM
#9
WD, this is a good idea and it does save CPU time and energy. At the end of the day, I paste a spreadsheet onto my drawing giving ACTUAL thread dimensions. What is drawn is representative only. But, if you are going to have the thread machined on a CNC lathe, the drawing/model needs to be correct ESPECIALLY if the thread is going to be a quick start that is the feathered end machined off while in the lathe.

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* December 20, 2010, 02:43:24 AM
#10
Thanks Steve

I realize your thoughts on feathering details.How ever I omitted the details of the thread in the video assuming that is understood in any machining process that this is a standard procedure to incorporate in the screw features.On any drawing most threads are spec.out to every detail chamfers,class fits,thread form,etc.

My goal was to illustrate the working with Linear Copy tool is a effective tool to process multiple copy's,You tube allows limited time and I had cutout thread details for time and upload to the link. In due time I have consider taking down all the videos due to lack of interest. They're primary as aid for TC tools usage.For professional tutorials I recommend Don Cheke's link.

Update: video was remove due to Google migration to YouTube
« Last Edit: April 08, 2011, 01:40:20 AM by wd »

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Even a mistake may turn out to be the one thing necessary to a worthwhile achievement Henry Ford
If I have ever made any valuable discoveries it has been owing more to patient attention than to any other talent Isaac Newton
I have not failed Ive just found 10,000 ways that won't work Thomas Edison


* December 20, 2010, 07:10:22 AM
#11
I guess my problem with linear copy was the way I was attempting to place the elements (creating the step mathematically). Apparently that wasn't precise enough. I tried wd's way with triangles instead of line segments and it worked fine (mostly).

Note: The "Use Compound Profile" isn't available in Deluxe.

Looked at the video -- great visual aid! However, the "create region" isn't on my menu or even in the manual, so I suppose it has been replaced or dropped. You can create regions by 2D add, but this is tedious in deluxe. Also, TC doesn't think that the little triangles sitting along the edge of the rectangle are close enough for 2D add. I suppose you could move them together 1/1000 th of the inch.

What I ended up doing was to explode everything, then select and delete the lines separating the triangles from the rectangle, and then creating a hatch region using pick-point. Several extra steps. Perhaps someone will have a better suggestion.

Thanks all!
Mark

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* February 11, 2019, 08:31:03 PM
#12
You can use a square or a (triangle pointing to the center) instead of a circle.

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