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Two stills
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* November 27, 2010, 08:00:51 PM
Here is a new crack at a design of mine. Modeled in TC rendered in Thea.


* November 27, 2010, 08:14:17 PM
#1
Really beautiful, Stephen.

Henry H

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November 27, 2010, 08:56:09 PM
#2
That's gorgeous Stephen! Nice work.

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BradE [ dean3Design ]
Core i7-3930K CPU @ 4.20GHz, 32GB 1333 DDR3, FirePro V5900
TC 21 Platinum (64-Bit) Running on Win7 Pro SP1


November 28, 2010, 04:46:16 AM
#3
Elegant, clean, design. Beautiful grain matching on the front.

Don Ritchie

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TC 11.2 and 17.2 Platinum


* November 28, 2010, 05:14:17 AM
#4
looks realistic nice work

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November 28, 2010, 09:55:32 AM
#5
Very clean design.  I think the render is very realistic, but the complete white background is a bit too, um, blank.

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November 28, 2010, 01:36:33 PM
#6
very realistic good job

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* November 28, 2010, 07:09:50 PM
#7
Thanks guys,
Tom I was going for this look on purpose to imitate my friends photo studio. He shot some of my furniture pieces there and I loved the stark background. the room I created has two skylights and a large windowed wall. The lighting is a combination IBL and sun with one omni.

Best,

Steve


December 03, 2010, 06:53:28 PM
#8
i love the real wood grain result

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December 04, 2010, 04:44:47 PM
#9
Excellent work.

Jeff

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December 04, 2010, 05:00:31 PM
#10
That really superb.  Will it work upside down?  Just kidding. ;D

Your "Vee Coffee Table" was the first picture I downloaded to show people what I was going to be able to do.

Alan H.

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TC v12.5  platinum build 58.6 w/vista 32bit


* December 04, 2010, 05:50:55 PM
#11
awesome ...

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learning turbocad pro 15.2


December 05, 2010, 06:55:38 AM
#12
I have a question about Thea. I downloaded it to have a look at it and saw that it would open .obj and .3ds file that TurbCAD can export. However when I opened in Thea parts were missing.

What file format do you save from TC to open in Thea? Have you noticed that parts are missing when opened in Thea?

BTW, those are some great images, hence my interest in looking at Thea - although I really hate the idea of using a package where I can't just use the native .tcw format.


* December 05, 2010, 08:27:47 AM
#13
Hi Don, I save them as mostly 3ds but sometimes obj. It seemes like the obj took longer to save. That said I have not had any problems with parts missing lately although I do remember a case where that happened a while back. Was the model you tried to export a combination of solid and surface before you saved it as a 3ds? Did you try exporting it as both 3ds and obj as well did you look at the export options for each file format. If you want you can send me the TC file and I can have a look.
Best,

Steve


December 05, 2010, 09:17:41 AM
#14
Hi Don, I save them as mostly 3ds but sometimes obj. It seemes like the obj took longer to save. That said I have not had any problems with parts missing lately although I do remember a case where that happened a while back. Was the model you tried to export a combination of solid and surface before you saved it as a 3ds? Did you try exporting it as both 3ds and obj as well did you look at the export options for each file format. If you want you can send me the TC file and I can have a look.
Best,

Steve

Thanks Steve,

I had tried both obj and 3ds. Like you said obj is much slower to translate. If I try any more, I will just experiment with the set up options and see if that makes a difference with missing parts.


* December 05, 2010, 05:16:15 PM
#15
Don I would recomend doing a test model where you try diffent types of objects and then see what comes through. as well You will have to scale the model you import. I believe you scale the 3ds model from turbo cad to .025 to make it translate properly.
 
Let me know how it works out.

Steve


* December 05, 2010, 05:23:24 PM
#16
Thanks guys for the feedback here is a new one with a studio IBL setup.
« Last Edit: December 05, 2010, 05:25:59 PM by Hammer »

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December 05, 2010, 05:45:55 PM
#17
Thanks guys for the feedback here is a new one with a studio IBL setup.

Steve,

It looks real enough to touch,

Kind of Looks like it has a little more stain on the left.  It shows up more in this image.  

Beautiful work,

Alan H.
« Last Edit: December 05, 2010, 05:48:42 PM by Alan H. »

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* December 05, 2010, 06:31:28 PM
#18
Thanks Alan!
You spotted one issue that I need to resolve and that is the original bitmap or image that I am using for the graining is not even in the exposure. The middle section is blow out or over exposed and the edges darker. This is most likely caused by flash being used when the picture was taken.
Is there a way in a photo editing program to even out exposure of an image? All advice would be helpful.

Thanks,

Steve


* December 05, 2010, 07:31:28 PM
#19
Thanks Alan!
You spotted one issue that I need to resolve and that is the original bitmap or image that I am using for the graining is not even in the exposure. The middle section is blow out or over exposed and the edges darker. This is most likely caused by flash being used when the picture was taken.
Is there a way in a photo editing program to even out exposure of an image? All advice would be helpful.

Thanks,

Steve

I have not tried this, but I wonder if one could place a gradient fill in an empty new image, then apply that image as a partly transparent layer over the problem image.

The problem you're experiencing is a major drawback to using most of the online freebies in TCad materials.

Henry H

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December 05, 2010, 07:38:40 PM
#20
Thanks Alan!
You spotted one issue that I need to resolve and that is the original bitmap or image that I am using for the graining is not even in the exposure. The middle section is blow out or over exposed and the edges darker. This is most likely caused by flash being used when the picture was taken.
Is there a way in a photo editing program to even out exposure of an image? All advice would be helpful.

Thanks,

Steve

Maybe something like the second paragraph on this page: http://www.luminescentphoto.com/articles/dynamic-range/dynamic2.html


December 05, 2010, 09:07:51 PM
#21
Thanks Alan!
You spotted one issue that I need to resolve and that is the original bitmap or image that I am using for the graining is not even in the exposure. The middle section is blow out or over exposed and the edges darker. This is most likely caused by flash being used when the picture was taken.
Is there a way in a photo editing program to even out exposure of an image? All advice would be helpful.

Thanks,

Steve

Photoshop is great for this sort of thing. As long as the uneven exposure isn't too extreme, you can generally touch it up using gradient maps and adjustment layers. That's what I did on the bottom image. I did a little more on the top image to illustrate how a completely different tone can be added to the wood.
« Last Edit: December 05, 2010, 09:45:12 PM by Brad Easterday »

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BradE [ dean3Design ]
Core i7-3930K CPU @ 4.20GHz, 32GB 1333 DDR3, FirePro V5900
TC 21 Platinum (64-Bit) Running on Win7 Pro SP1


December 05, 2010, 11:39:06 PM
#22
Thanks Alan!
You spotted one issue that I need to resolve and that is the original bitmap or image that I am using for the graining is not even in the exposure. The middle section is blow out or over exposed and the edges darker. This is most likely caused by flash being used when the picture was taken.
Is there a way in a photo editing program to even out exposure of an image? All advice would be helpful.

Thanks,

Steve

Photoshop is great for this sort of thing. As long as the uneven exposure isn't too extreme, you can generally touch it up using gradient maps and adjustment layers. That's what I did on the bottom image. I did a little more on the top image to illustrate how a completely different tone can be added to the wood.

Brad,

That's a remarkable adjustment. 

Ask and ye shall receive....

Let me try,

Any tricks for when it happens on a real piece?

Steve,

I'm curious, are you "hands on" in the shop?
And in the gallery, am I looking at a "cad images" or photo of "finished products"?


Alan H.

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December 06, 2010, 04:33:39 AM
#23
re: Any tricks for when it happens on a real piece?

Sandpaper? :)

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BradE [ dean3Design ]
Core i7-3930K CPU @ 4.20GHz, 32GB 1333 DDR3, FirePro V5900
TC 21 Platinum (64-Bit) Running on Win7 Pro SP1


* December 06, 2010, 02:06:08 PM
#24

I'm curious, are you "hands on" in the shop?
And in the gallery, am I looking at a "cad images" or photo of "finished products"?[/color]

Alan H.

[/quote]

Alan, I am a one man shop so all pieces I make are made by me. Take a look at the press section of the site and you will see an article I wrote for Fine Woodworking magazine that shows the process. As for the gallery it is about half and half real pieces verses renders. It really depends on if I had the money to get the piece photographed properly or not ;D


Thanks guys for the great advice

Brad that is amazing what you did I will play with that feature this week.


December 06, 2010, 03:54:12 PM
#25
Alan, I am a one man shop so all pieces I make are made by me. Take a look at the press section of the site and you will see an article I wrote for Fine Woodworking magazine that shows the process. As for the gallery it is about half and half real pieces verses renders. It really depends on if I had the money to get the piece photographed properly or not ;D

Steve,

OK, now I'm even more impressed. ;)

I wasn't sure if you did any of the work because there are words like "we" and "us" in the website.  I would've figured it out once I read more, but I wasn't even sure if you were just an employee.

Now, I'm curious, any response to this.....
------------------
Ask and ye shall receive....

Let me try,

Any tricks for when it happens on a real piece?
---------------------

Brads answer wasn't terribly creative.(No offense Brad)

Alan H.

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* December 06, 2010, 05:49:34 PM
#26
Alan, It's the royal we  ;) As far as staining goes I do mostly oil and wax finish with out color however for projects where color is requested I use water base Dyes. They are much easier to control and if a color goes to strong you can wet it and wipe down surface to lessen the intensity. As well you can use shellac as color it comes in many varieties and is a surface finish so if you do not like it can be removed with alcahol. If all else fails Brad is right sandpaper.
woodweb is a good resorce to check out as well.

Steve


December 06, 2010, 07:02:09 PM
#27
Alan, I am a one man shop so all pieces I make are made by me. Take a look at the press section of the site and you will see an article I wrote for Fine Woodworking magazine that shows the process. As for the gallery it is about half and half real pieces verses renders. It really depends on if I had the money to get the piece photographed properly or not ;D

Great article and stand Stephen. You are a master of your craft.

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BradE [ dean3Design ]
Core i7-3930K CPU @ 4.20GHz, 32GB 1333 DDR3, FirePro V5900
TC 21 Platinum (64-Bit) Running on Win7 Pro SP1


* December 06, 2010, 08:48:40 PM
#28
Thanks Brad, But I still have a long way to go down this road.


December 07, 2010, 01:48:20 PM
#29
Alan, It's the royal we  ;) As far as staining goes I do mostly oil and wax finish with out color however for projects where color is requested I use water base Dyes. They are much easier to control and if a color goes to strong you can wet it and wipe down surface to lessen the intensity. As well you can use shellac as color it comes in many varieties and is a surface finish so if you do not like it can be removed with alcahol. If all else fails Brad is right sandpaper.
woodweb is a good resorce to check out as well.

Steve

Steve,

I have been making cabinets and other elements related to residential remodeling for nearly 30 years, only fireplace mantels get the attention that you would give to furniture, but they're still nowhere near the level of joinery that you do.

With that said, for me, sanding would also be the last resort.  My first attempt might be to add more stain in an attempt to even it out.

California's making a strong attempt to phase out Oil based Products.  I've had some bad experience with the water based polyurethanes changing the color of the work.  Is New York limiting their Oil Product sales?

Do you use the woodworking add-on?

Alan H.
« Last Edit: December 10, 2010, 02:50:37 PM by Alan H. »

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* December 07, 2010, 06:19:54 PM
#30


  Is New York limiting their Oil Product sales?

Do you use the woodworking add-on?

Alan H.
[/quote]

Alan,
New york has much stricter VOC laws now. They can only sell oil products in quarts and there is talk of eliminating lacquer thinner based lacquer as well. I started using the water based lacquers about eight years ago for my cabinety and commercial work where lacquer is speced with fairly good results. It keeps getting better, however I still use shellac as a base to bring out the color and depth.
What are you refering to by wood working add on?


December 08, 2010, 12:10:34 AM
#31
What are you refering to by wood working add on?

Sorry, I meant the "furniture maker" add-on.

Alan H.

EDIT
There is a wood working Plug-in (kind of), I guess they are having trouble making up their mind.
http://forums.turbocad.com/index.php/topic,1600.0.html
http://forums.turbocad.com/index.php/topic,745.0.html
http://forums.turbocad.com/index.php/topic,2962.0.html
END EDIT
« Last Edit: December 10, 2010, 12:47:19 PM by Alan H. »

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* December 08, 2010, 10:31:20 AM
#32
Alan
I don't because Just about everything I do is so custom. That said I haven't really looked into it properly. Do you use it?
I get huge milage out of the Drafting pallet. I am going to up load a set of shop drawings soon to show what most of my daily work with TC is all about.

Steve


December 08, 2010, 11:17:26 AM
#33
Do you use it?

My initial reason for starting with cad was start creating blueprints on the computer(2D).  After seen these images in the gallery, I got excited about 3D modeling and started a new addiction.  But, I'm such a hands-on guy that the thought of "wiggling my thumb" for a living is still bewildering(for lack of a better word). 

I have probably remodeled 80 kitchens.(No subcontractors from start to finish) Years ago I switched from building cabinets to buying cabinets and modifying what doesn't meet the needs. Building them was an incredible chunk of time in my one man shop.  I figured 1/3  of the process was creating an "accurate cut list". (1/3 cutting the materials and 1/3 to assemble)  I sure turbocad (furniture maker) will change these proportions.

But, the answer is I have not tried furniture maker.

Alan H.

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