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Theodolite
Read 736 times
* November 13, 2018, 10:53:52 AM
Just for the heckuvit, I bought this thing from a company that sells weird things cheap. Thought it would be a challenging thing to draw, and that turned out to be a correct assessment ;-)

Rendered with LightWorks Advanced Render, "Presentation 10m," tweaked just a teensy bit.

This gadget has a couple of features I haven't figured out, so if anybody out there is familiar with it, I'd sure like to hear from you.

Henry H

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November 13, 2018, 12:52:59 PM
#1
Pretty obvious that it's a surveyor's tool, but seeing as how you have correctly named it, you already knew that.

The little bit of research I just did includes the possibility that it could have been used for construction.

Still and all, very nice work.


Jeff

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TC Pro Platinum 2018, 2017, 2016 & 2015 (all with LightWorks & RedSDK) & V21
System: i7-5820K @ 3.30GHz, ASRock X99 Extreme4, 16GB DDR4-2133 RAM, Gigabyte GTX 970, Samsung NVMe SSD 950 (256GB), Windows 7 Pro (64-bit) SP1


* November 13, 2018, 01:06:45 PM
#2
Very impressive, great looking model.  It does look quite a challenge to draw.

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* November 13, 2018, 03:09:14 PM
#3
Great work. Looking at all those dials, they must've been the 'fun part' of the project. Are the text and hash marks actual objects or wrapped images?

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John R.

V17—V21, 2015—2018
Designer, Deluxe, Expert, Basic, Platinum
RedSDK enabled, except in 2018
Windows 10, 64-bit


* November 13, 2018, 06:11:22 PM
#4
Great work. Looking at all those dials, they must've been the 'fun part' of the project. Are the text and hash marks actual objects or wrapped images?

Thanx, John. A few of the marks are actual objects subtracted from the substrate and a different material applied to the resulting new facets. The text and the lines on the dials are wrapped images.

Henry H

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* November 13, 2018, 08:01:15 PM
#5
Great work. Looking at all those dials, they must've been the 'fun part' of the project. Are the text and hash marks actual objects or wrapped images?

Thanx, John. A few of the marks are actual objects subtracted from the substrate and a different material applied to the resulting new facets. The text and the lines on the dials are wrapped images.

Henry H

What I did in Deluxe 2018 with the Tool Vise was to activate the "Transfer Material" option in "Advanced Preferences". My hash marks had a material already applied, so when they were 3D Subtracted, the material is left behind. I would now go back to Advanced Preferences and deactivate "Transfer Materials". I did discover that I should do this subtraction all at once, as the last boolean process. Any boolean operation that might occur later could wipe out all that material in those facets. I'll post something in the Tool Vise post.

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John R.

V17—V21, 2015—2018
Designer, Deluxe, Expert, Basic, Platinum
RedSDK enabled, except in 2018
Windows 10, 64-bit


November 14, 2018, 12:09:48 AM
#6
Henry,

very nice work on the model, very nice indeed.  2 x  8)

That is the weirdest theodolite I have ever seen!
My first thought, was that it looked more like a transit level.  But, hey ho, what do I know?

Are there any part numbers/serial numbers/manufacturers names on the instrument?

Regards Tim

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You can design without engineering, but you cannot engineer without design.
Using Win 10 with Designer 2017 and TurboCAD Pro. Plat. 2016/2017/2018 + Lightworks (64-bit versions).


* November 14, 2018, 05:47:07 AM
#7
Isn't it upside down, Henry ?

It's always inspiring to see your handy work.  :)

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"What do I know, I'm still learning"..
Windows 7 64 bit HP > on a stock HP laptop with 4gb-2.4 GHz.Turbocad 2018-2017, TurboCad Platinum 21.Using Lightworks and Redsdk, Anilab lab 5. ATI Mobility Radeon HD 4500/5100


* November 14, 2018, 08:45:27 AM
#8
Great work. Looking at all those dials, they must've been the 'fun part' of the project. Are the text and hash marks actual objects or wrapped images?

Thanx, John. A few of the marks are actual objects subtracted from the substrate and a different material applied to the resulting new facets. The text and the lines on the dials are wrapped images.

Henry H

What I did in Deluxe 2018 with the Tool Vise was to activate the "Transfer Material" option in "Advanced Preferences". My hash marks had a material already applied, so when they were 3D Subtracted, the material is left behind. I would now go back to Advanced Preferences and deactivate "Transfer Materials". I did discover that I should do this subtraction all at once, as the last boolean process. Any boolean operation that might occur later could wipe out all that material in those facets. I'll post something in the Tool Vise post.

Yup, I used that technique too in this drawing.

EDIT: For example, the screw heads in the attached screenshot were modeled by subtracting copies of the "Screw-Head Maker" from the basic objects.

Henry H
« Last Edit: November 14, 2018, 03:31:55 PM by Henry Hubich »

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* November 14, 2018, 08:54:49 AM
#9
Henry,

very nice work on the model, very nice indeed.  2 x  8)

That is the weirdest theodolite I have ever seen!
My first thought, was that it looked more like a transit level.  But, hey ho, what do I know?

Are there any part numbers/serial numbers/manufacturers names on the instrument?

Regards Tim

Yup, it's weird all right. It was evidently made by/for an Oriental outfit. The numerals are Arabic but the few textual characters (which do not include a manufacturer's name) are Oriental. The angle scales are not in degrees and minutes, but in hexacontades (sixtieths of a full circle) and hundredths. I suspect it has some military function.

Henry H

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* November 14, 2018, 08:56:11 AM
#10
Isn't it upside down, Henry ?

It's always inspiring to see your handy work.  :)

Thanx, Dean. No, it's right side up.

Henry H

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November 14, 2018, 09:06:39 AM
#11
    Boy, the plot thickens!    :-\

Regards Tim

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You can design without engineering, but you cannot engineer without design.
Using Win 10 with Designer 2017 and TurboCAD Pro. Plat. 2016/2017/2018 + Lightworks (64-bit versions).


* November 14, 2018, 05:42:53 PM
#12
Strange - that theodolite doesn't look "weird" or the wrong way up to me, because it's invisible!

Something's barred the pictures from my computer, but only for this thread. l can view the rest of the Gallery easily enough.

Reading about the strange divisions and your idea it may have been a military instrument, if so, perhaps for artillery range-finding? I don't know much about guns, but I wonder if those units facilitate ballistics calculations, in which case it may have been issued originally with specially-written, trig-derived, tables?

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Nigel.

On TC Deluxe 19: hobby use.


November 14, 2018, 05:51:08 PM
#13
Strange - that theodolite doesn't look "weird" or the wrong way up to me, because it's invisible!

Something's barred the pictures from my computer, but only for this thread. l can view the rest of the Gallery easily enough.

Do you see the image in Reply #8?

Can you right-click in the area where images should be and select Download?


Jeff

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TC Pro Platinum 2018, 2017, 2016 & 2015 (all with LightWorks & RedSDK) & V21
System: i7-5820K @ 3.30GHz, ASRock X99 Extreme4, 16GB DDR4-2133 RAM, Gigabyte GTX 970, Samsung NVMe SSD 950 (256GB), Windows 7 Pro (64-bit) SP1


* November 14, 2018, 06:03:20 PM
#14
Quote
Strange - that theodolite doesn't look "weird" or the wrong way up to me, because it's invisible!

Something's barred the pictures from my computer, but only for this thread. l can view the rest of the Gallery easily enough.

Its because they are bmp images, they are not being displayed properly (for me) on the forum for some reason.

One can click on the words, they are a hyperlink, and windows will ask if you want to open, which opens in a windows photo viewer, or save (I always choose open s I only want to view the image, not keep it).
« Last Edit: November 14, 2018, 06:09:45 PM by Andy H »

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* November 14, 2018, 06:05:14 PM
#15
PAB-2 soviet artillery scope (which can have a periscope attached)

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* November 14, 2018, 06:13:17 PM
#16
PAB-2 soviet artillery scope (which can have a periscope attached)

Bingo! Thanks, Andy.

Henry H

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November 14, 2018, 06:50:25 PM
#17


November 15, 2018, 01:06:30 AM
#18
PAB-2 soviet artillery scope (which can have a periscope attached)
Andy,

    excellent news!

Regards Tim
« Last Edit: November 16, 2018, 12:16:16 AM by Tim Stewart »

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You can design without engineering, but you cannot engineer without design.
Using Win 10 with Designer 2017 and TurboCAD Pro. Plat. 2016/2017/2018 + Lightworks (64-bit versions).


* November 15, 2018, 08:48:15 AM
#19
Got it,Andy - -Thank you.

A tiny little link down in the bottom corner, so not very obvious.

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Nigel.

On TC Deluxe 19: hobby use.


November 15, 2018, 01:48:00 PM
#20
Very nice!

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TurboCAD LTE/DoubleCAD Pro V7.
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Christchurch, Middle Earth.


* November 15, 2018, 05:40:03 PM
#21
My "theodolite" looks virtually identical to the PAB-2 except that the markings are a different language/alphabet.

Henry H

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November 16, 2018, 12:28:16 AM
#22
Henry,

    I was just wondering, if the scale readings, which appear to be related to either left or right, are vernier?
    Or, maybe they are coarse and fine adjustments?
    It would be interesting to find out, to pique our curiosity further perhaps.

Regards Tim

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You can design without engineering, but you cannot engineer without design.
Using Win 10 with Designer 2017 and TurboCAD Pro. Plat. 2016/2017/2018 + Lightworks (64-bit versions).


* November 16, 2018, 09:53:54 AM
#23
Yes, there is a Vernier scale on the azimuth movement at least: the smaller graduated plate above the main protractor.

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Nigel.

On TC Deluxe 19: hobby use.


* November 16, 2018, 10:25:16 AM
#24
Tim and Nigel, as far as I can tell, those scales are not verniers; certainly not the kind of verniers I'm familiar with. Rather than vernier scales, this device uses the fine graduations on the knurled knobs to set/read hundredths of the main-scale graduations. (This works out to increments of 0.06 degree. It's a lot easier to read than vernier scales but not especially precise, IMO.)

Henry H
« Last Edit: November 26, 2018, 05:42:42 PM by Henry Hubich »

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* November 16, 2018, 12:20:49 PM
#25
Ah, yes - sorry! I was looking at the Theodolite 104 picture, and for some reason didn't spot the numbers extending past the plate on the upper scale.

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Nigel.

On TC Deluxe 19: hobby use.


November 16, 2018, 01:00:30 PM
#26
Tim and Nigel, as far as I can tell, those scales are not verniers; certainly not the kind of verniers I'm familiar with. Rather than vernier scales, this device uses the fine graduations on the knurled knobs to set/read hundredths of the main-scale graduations. (This works out to increments of 0.06 degree. It's a lot easier to read than vernier scales but not especially precise, IMO.)

Henry H

The scale is up to 60. Is that not minutes? As in, one minute of angle (see below)

Note: The transit and theodolite are used by the surveyor to measure both horizontal and vertical angles.  While the purpose of the two is similar, as a general rule a theodolite is more accurate than a transit.  However, there is no specific rule as to when one definition ends and the other begins.  Generally, these instruments have a minimum accuracy of one minute of angle and some very precise theodolites will measure angles to an accuracy of one-tenth of a second of angle.  To put these accuracies into perspective, at a distance of one mile, one minute of angle covers about 1.5 feet.  At a distance of one mile, one-tenth of a second of angle covers about 0.003 feet.


* November 16, 2018, 01:14:21 PM
#27
This is an interesting one.  according to one seller there is an 'PAB-2 AT'  used by the Yugoslavian army, and an American document just states it is from Eastern European communist armies.

The red symbol on Henrys model, according to google, could be Japanese though the translation differs depending on which translator is used, (google says the translation is 'People',   which seems odd).

I would guess that the symbols changed depending on which country / army the scope was sold to.  There were quite a few countries linked with Russia in the 1970's

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* November 16, 2018, 01:20:35 PM
#28
Tim and Nigel, as far as I can tell, those scales are not verniers; certainly not the kind of verniers I'm familiar with. Rather than vernier scales, this device uses the fine graduations on the knurled knobs to set/read hundredths of the main-scale graduations. (This works out to increments of 0.06 degree. It's a lot easier to read than vernier scales but not especially precise, IMO.)

Henry H

The scale is up to 60. Is that not minutes? As in, one minute of angle (see below)

Note: The transit and theodolite are used by the surveyor to measure both horizontal and vertical angles.  While the purpose of the two is similar, as a general rule a theodolite is more accurate than a transit.  However, there is no specific rule as to when one definition ends and the other begins.  Generally, these instruments have a minimum accuracy of one minute of angle and some very precise theodolites will measure angles to an accuracy of one-tenth of a second of angle.  To put these accuracies into perspective, at a distance of one mile, one minute of angle covers about 1.5 feet.  At a distance of one mile, one-tenth of a second of angle covers about 0.003 feet.

Hi, Don...

One complete turn of the upper portion of this instrument about the vertical axis corresponds to sixty divisions of both of the large horizontal scales. Therefore one scale division equals six degrees. One complete turn of either of the two upper horizontal knurled knobs corresponds to one hundred of the scale divisions on the knob and causes the upper portion of the instrument to rotate through just six degrees about the vertical axis. Thus each division on the knurled-knob scale corresponds to 0.06 degree, or 3.6 minutes -- which IMHO is not precise enough to warrant the name of "theodolite."

At one time or another in the past I have had occasion to use both surveyors' transits and theodolites, and this particular gadget has very little resemblance to anything I've seen before.

Henry H

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* November 20, 2018, 09:09:56 PM
#29
This is very very nice work! Great job!!

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Pro Platinum 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018


* November 28, 2018, 07:27:11 AM
#30
Luv the dial work on that wow I just asked in Topics forum General Discussion  how to do that add text etc. on curvy surfaces.
« Last Edit: November 28, 2018, 07:29:05 AM by to »

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