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A segmented transition piece
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April 01, 2018, 03:35:56 PM
This I started for some prints back in 2015 and am just picking up on it again, the idea was for engineering apprentices as a final year test fabrication that could be scaled down proportionally to fit whatever was required with available materials. You will notice that the joints are actually circular instead of elliptical purely to add a bit more into the pattern development skills.It is for artwork so will not follow the traditional colors and may end up in various colors and even artwork as the background.

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* April 01, 2018, 07:04:01 PM
#1
Pretty challenging!

Henry H

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* April 02, 2018, 04:14:31 AM
#2
Nice work Michael.  Glad I don't have to do it, I'd have to cheat and hope TC can work everything out.   

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April 02, 2018, 09:43:20 AM
#3
I used to do a lot of pattern making at one time Andy and back in the earrly 80's created a number of software programs on what was then a Sinclair QL computer which had a really good programming language called Superbasic that I would then compile for speed. Lots of interest in manual pattern development also.

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April 03, 2018, 02:56:07 AM
#4
Interesting design challenge.  I was cogitating just how I would do it.


Jeff

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* April 03, 2018, 07:22:42 AM
#5
You've got a very interesting background, Orion. I remember Sinclair QL. So cool to meet someone who did programming for it.

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April 03, 2018, 03:00:08 PM
#6
Superbaasic was a great basic language and the Sinclair QL went on to become another variant by another company called Thor but I vanished to New Zealand at that time and did some template work as well as computer design and drafting. I developed a series of templates for a lad I knew who was a boat builder in the bay of plenty for a large rigid hull inflatable vessel that for many years carried sightseers through the hole in the rock in the bay of islands off Auckland, the original templates had not catered for the stretch different ways with the material and left puckering at the joints which we ironed out.

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* April 05, 2018, 08:44:46 PM
#7
I grew up in NZ before coming to Australia, Michael, I visit there every couple of years.  There's a popular aluminium boat in NZ that I've noticed called a "Stabicraft"  with a hull that's built like a transition piece.  No stretch or expansion, the plate is cut, bent and welded.   Probably not the slickest thing through the water, but it must be easy to build with unsophisticated tooling, like a marine Land Rover or Jeep.   

*edit*  an unfold/flatten tool for general ruled surfaces is one that TC's still missing.  You say that the joints are circular, so they can't be conical sections, current unfold won't cooperate.     
   
« Last Edit: April 05, 2018, 09:49:12 PM by murray dickinson »

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April 06, 2018, 04:24:40 PM
#8
I will do another drawing to go with this one that shows the conventional pattern development, basically you just have a perpendicular line that extends oft from another line that runs to both centers of the joints and then take the distances for an elliptical mid section of the segment and space the divisions based on that  ellipse spacings and then it is purely a series of perpendicular lines from the joint intersections.if that makes sense.I am busy on some other artwork at present but will try and get around to that in the next month.

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April 06, 2018, 04:46:15 PM
#9
Correction on my last post, the two ellipses that are perpendicular to the throat of the segment are required and   then perpendicular lines are drawn from them as the segment is still conical but conical ellipses and not circles.Not really good at explaining this but may do a rough sketch in the next few days to show the pattern method.
« Last Edit: April 06, 2018, 05:20:17 PM by Orion20036 »

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April 06, 2018, 05:38:59 PM
#10
I grew up in NZ before coming to Australia, Michael, I visit there every couple of years.  There's a popular aluminium boat in NZ that I've noticed called a "Stabicraft"  with a hull that's built like a transition piece.  No stretch or expansion, the plate is cut, bent and welded.   Probably not the slickest thing through the water, but it must be easy to build with unsophisticated tooling, like a marine Land Rover or Jeep.   

*edit*  an unfold/flatten tool for general ruled surfaces is one that TC's still missing.  You say that the joints are circular, so they can't be conical sections, current unfold won't cooperate.     
 


The Boat builder who built rigid hull inflatables in Mount Maunganui had a company called IBC (Inflatable boat company) and he really took pride in his work and everything was done by hand and you could see the difference between his  boats and the mass produced ones. Not sure if he is still doing it as he may have retired now but any Rigid Hull Inflatable with IBC on is a good safe bet.

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