TurboCAD Forums

The Ultimate Resource for TurboCAD Knowledge

Register
 
The purpose of these forums is to discuss TurboCAD.  Please keep the discussion of other products to compatibility issues or how the other software’s can be used with TurboCAD.


Handley Page Victor
Read 503 times
March 26, 2018, 10:26:57 AM
There was a threesome of Royal Air Force Jet bombers developed into service in the early 1960s.  They  were the backbone of our Nuclear force until 1982 when the Royal Navy brought its nuclear boomers into operation.  The Vulcan was the only one to fly an actual bombing run on the Falklands in the 1982.  The Victors had been converted to tankers and  supported the Vulcan with 16 refuelling flights on the 8000 mile trip fro Ascension to Falklands and back.  There was an interesting documentary on it some time ago when the pilot explained that to avoid the radar missiles warnings during the run, they stayed low and fast on the way out and worried about running out of fuel and ditching in the Atlantic.  They were almighty relieved when the last Victor appeared in front of them with fuel gauges virtually on empty.

Although the Victor was more popular at Air Shows, I think the Victor is "prettier" and looks more threatening.  The wing and tail plane are complex lofts, the engine air intakes were a nightmare as the are curved in all three planes  and took much "bodging" to get right.

Logged
regards
Colin Reid
TC2017 Pro Platinum 64 bit  + LW plugin on Win10 desktop and  Quad Intel i7 with 32GB RAM + 128GB  SSD and 2TB partitioned hard disk, NVidia 2GB video


* March 26, 2018, 11:06:40 AM
#1
That's a great job, Colin.

Henry H

Logged


* March 27, 2018, 02:12:49 AM
#2
I've seen Vulcans at air shows in Australia and New Zealand before they were decommissioned, they were pretty awesome rumbling overhead at low altitude, but never saw a Valiant or Victor.  I agree with you that it's a particularly "pretty" plane for a military subject, and your model and render are lovely too.  What drawings or data did you model it from, Colin?  I grew up reading the Brit periodicals Aeromodeller and Scale Models, those titles both ran a set of drawings by a draftsman named Pat Lloyd, and I bought a set of his 1/72 versions from the publisher somewhere between thirty and forty years ago, still have 'em.  They even had drawings of Britain's Blue Steel nuclear missile.  I remember searching whether his drawings were still available more recently (well, probably more than a decade ago) and he had a web site and was selling them directly, but Google has buried that.   Through Ron Moulton, the publisher of those magazines, Lloyd was also indirectly associated with the Gossamer Albatross project, the human-powered aircraft that won the Kremer prize for crossing the English Channel, which was another of his drafting subjects.
As an aside, I've read an analysis by an aero historian who contends that the UK surrendered the advantage it had from Whittle's invention of the jet engine.  The Air Ministry more-or-less made it compulsory (ie by not financing other designs) to embed the engines in the wing roots like the V-bombers and the Comet airliner, instead of hanging them in pods off pylons like the US engineers' designs, which meant that they needed a lot more re-engineering to fit alternative engines.   Probably not the whole story, but maybe a factor. 

Logged


* March 30, 2018, 05:40:19 AM
#3
Very Nice Model Colin. I am sure it took a lot of work. Carroll

Logged
Carroll D. Peppersack
TurboCad 14.2 Deluxe
TurboCad 20 Plat


March 30, 2018, 07:10:49 AM
#4


March 30, 2018, 09:52:28 AM
#5
Henry and Don - from you two legends, high praise indeed.

Carrol P - yes lots of time but the finished TCW is only 6.5MB. I have added two closer vies in wireframe and render to show the engine intake complexity.  Wish I had not as I spotted some render flaws.

Marray Dickinson - I started with the basic shapes and dimensions from a Google search.  But then I found an old set of drawings by Bentley giving much more detail (including Blue Steel). Those A1 drawings were scanned, vector rastered and joined into DXF/TCW files as the base of the final model.  I only saw Victors at Ascension Island in 1984 as they were supporting Hercules flights to Falklands (including Mrs Thatcher who did the trip inside a sound proofed caravan stuffed inside the Herc).  The other irony is that my brother flew for 10 years as a Vulcan radar navigator.  I am not sure about the RAF starving Whittle mostly because they did not see it sense as the experimental Gloster E28 was much slower than Spits, etc. It took BMW and Messerschmidt to show how it should be done.  I would class the inboard engine solution as an example of how Britain is world class at barking up the wrong tree and sticking to it.  The RAF learnt the hard was of altering a plane to fit an English jet to the Phantom  at huge cost.  (Another one of my bro's flying career).

Logged
regards
Colin Reid
TC2017 Pro Platinum 64 bit  + LW plugin on Win10 desktop and  Quad Intel i7 with 32GB RAM + 128GB  SSD and 2TB partitioned hard disk, NVidia 2GB video


March 30, 2018, 09:53:38 AM
#6
Whoops one picture went walkabout.

Logged
regards
Colin Reid
TC2017 Pro Platinum 64 bit  + LW plugin on Win10 desktop and  Quad Intel i7 with 32GB RAM + 128GB  SSD and 2TB partitioned hard disk, NVidia 2GB video


* March 31, 2018, 03:44:14 PM
#7
I haven't looked them out yet, but I think that you're right and I'm wrong about Bentley being the draftsman of the Victor print that I've got.  I think that I've also got a copy of Scale Models mag somewhere in the morgue/archive/shed that has his drawings of Vulcan. 

Logged


* April 02, 2018, 04:02:07 AM
#8
Very nice work Colin, I do like the tail (or whatever its called), I know nothing about planes, only been on two in my life, and one of them was just to the Isle of Man.

Logged