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Call for Different 3D Printers
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* June 03, 2017, 02:50:57 PM
Does anyone use TurboCAD to print with any 3D printers other than the BFB (Bits from Bytes) printers?

Please list the printers you have used and the output file type(s) used (for example .stl):


John

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* June 04, 2017, 02:18:28 AM
#1
What is a BFB (Bits from Bytes) printer? Is it a technology, a brand, or what?

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Gary Wooding
Win10 64-bit,
TC21.2 x64 Plat, Bld59
TC16.2 Plat, Bld54.0
TCC 3.5


* June 04, 2017, 04:54:42 AM
#2
What is a BFB (Bits from Bytes) printer? Is it a technology, a brand, or what?

Hopefully my memory is correct - Bits from Bytes was a UK 3D printer maker and kit supplier which started out years ago producing / selling RepRap similar 3D printers then branched out a bit, it was then bought by 3D Systems, TC can somehow transfer a model to the BfB slicing software 'Axon' via tools-3D print,  I've never tried it as I don't have 'Axon' installed.

BfB legacy printers - https://www.3dsystems.com/shop/support/legacy/manuals

At one time IMSI sold 3D printers (like the 3D touch) which I assume is why it can communicate with Axon.

Does anyone use TurboCAD to print with any 3D printers other than the BFB (Bits from Bytes) printers?

Please list the printers you have used and the output file type(s) used (for example .stl)

For Home (non commercial) 3D printing, I think you will find most users save as .stl, because it is supported by the various slicing software, and can even be sent to commercial printing companies like Shapeways.

Printers I've seen mentioned on here are Makerbot, Ultimaker and Flashforge, I have at present a cheap Wanhao (in bits awaiting some slight modifications when I get time).

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* June 04, 2017, 08:15:06 AM
#3
Thanks Andy.
To answer the OP's question, I use an Ultimaker-2 with Cura as the slicer.  Cura will accept STL and 3MF, and some other formats, but I've only used STL.

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Gary Wooding
Win10 64-bit,
TC21.2 x64 Plat, Bld59
TC16.2 Plat, Bld54.0
TCC 3.5


* July 22, 2017, 11:14:41 AM
#4
hi!
I want to port my commercial 3d printer design to TurboCAD. That's why i bought TC in the first place! Currently it is in FreeCAD, yet many parts of the 3d printer, freecad can already not display, as it 'crashes' on them (it has bugs everywhere). I bet i'll make many designs of other objects in turbocad, port those to STL then slice those to gcode for the 3d printer after which the firmware of 3d printer prints them; this is for parts that are not part of the 3d printer as the 3d printer is entirely from metal of course :)

As for printing small objects at a 3d printer - all you need is a manner to port them to a triangle format and then slice those triangle formats. A 3d printer is way more forgiving than for example a CNC milling machine. hard 90 degree angles inside pockets is no problem for a 3d printer. Of course if you would really accurately measure those, it's not hard 90 degrees, yet at a cnc milling machine this would be a major problem.

So the demands for which software you use for a 3d printer are not very high in terms of design.

As for slicing that is yet another chapter :)


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* July 22, 2017, 11:26:13 AM
#5
So John, the normal procedure if you design something in a CAD program or other design software:

CAD format ==> Triangle format ==> Gcode format

So the CAD software usually you use to write a triangle format, usually STL as most slicers just know STL and nothing else.
Then you have a slicer that converts the triangle format into GCODE, that is a textfile with commands specific for just 1 specific printer.
then usually you have a program at a mobile phone or PC that writes a bunch of the gcodes commands to the 3d printer, either via an USB cable (most reliable format) or using wifi and the 3d printer which buffers those gcode commands, it has its own internal small simple computer with firmware on it that is executing those gcode commands and prints the object with it on the 3d printer.

Of course some programs combine several of those steps.
Most persons 3d printing just download from the internet a STL file. They do not need any sort of CAD software in short.
There is many websites that collect STL files that you can 3d print. Thingiverse and if you google you'll find a lot more.

Note that there is sneaky ownership legal details for example at thingiverse - i'm not recommending any website there nor disadvicing one. Just mentionning that they are there.


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