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3D Print metal with an Electron Beam
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October 09, 2015, 12:34:59 PM
This technology allows you to print anywhere from 7 to 20 pounds of metal per hour, with sizes up to 19 FEET (by 4 ft by 4 ft) or 8 feet around, in a variety of metals (steel, stainless steel, aluminum, inconel, titanium, etc.).

http://www.sciaky.com/additive-manufacturing/electron-beam-additive-manufacturing-technology

It's supposed to be more economical, but I haven't done any comparison quotes.


Jeff

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October 09, 2015, 02:16:10 PM
#1
It is sure a great day and age to be alive with all the cool stuff that is being developed.

I had to chuckle the other day as I uploaded a part to Shapeways. Pricing showed ~$9.00 for the part printed in black plastic - and further down the list was the price for gold at $5300. That must be gold plated, one would think. Platinum was $15.500. Fat chance I will be ordering that.

To the point of my post.... After reading your post I wondered what process Shapeways uses to create there metal printed parts. If they to are just plated somehow, or utilize something like you show in your link. One day I will investigate this further. For now I was just curious.


October 09, 2015, 10:09:43 PM
#2
The metal objects I have made by Shapeways are 3D printed in wax and packed in sand for a traditional Cast Pour.


Jeff


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System: i7-5820K @ 3.30GHz, ASRock X99 Extreme4, 16GB DDR4-2133 RAM, Gigabyte GTX 970, Samsung NVMe SSD 950 (256GB), Windows 7 Pro (64-bit) SP1


October 10, 2015, 06:03:18 AM
#3
The metal objects I have made by Shapeways are 3D printed in wax and packed in sand for a traditional Cast Pour.
Jeff

Cool. Thanks for sharing that info.


* October 11, 2015, 11:55:41 AM
#4
This is more Electron Beam Welding than printing Jeff, but is also my interpretation of how 3d metal prints should be created and has great potential for varying alloy properties of material throughout the thickness and length of the object which is the engineering dream turned into reality.
« Last Edit: October 11, 2015, 12:01:01 PM by Orion20036 »

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