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Liquid Printing
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* March 19, 2015, 08:38:56 AM
Any thoughts on Liquid Printing?  Would it use the usual .STL format?
Check link:
 http://gizmodo.com/new-liquid-3d-printing-system-is-25-times-faster-than-i-1691865330

John B.

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John B.
TCv2016 Pro Platinum
Windows 7 Pro 64 Bit
1 GB Hard Drive 16 GB RAM
AMD Radeon HD 7700


March 19, 2015, 09:46:18 AM
#1
Hi John,

    interesting.  8)

        But, it looks like a case, for the moment, of 'watch this space'.

            Regards Tim

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You can design without engineering, but you cannot engineer without design.
Testing/using with Win 10 and various TurboCAD 64-bit versions.


* March 19, 2015, 11:04:56 AM
#2
Should be capable of fine detail if it using a laser, if its not stl format, I'd expect an stl import filter.

I haven't looked at the 3D news for a while so just had quick look and 3D printing sure is moving along at a fast pace, they are printing a type of human tissue, and crowdfunding for a new low cost mini 3D metal printer $1500 (printing around 3 inch cube), so one could use TC to design jewellery and then print it oneself in silver or gold (or brass if budget is tight). 

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March 19, 2015, 01:25:59 PM
#3
Other articles state that printing speed would be in the "100s of millimeters per hour" range and resolution could be better than 100 microns.

Here's a link to an abstract.  There is more technical info if you register: http://www.sciencemag.org/content/347/6228/1349.abstract

What this means for STL files is that you would have to go into TurboCAD's 'Advanced' ACIS settings and greatly increase file size (by creating more smaller facets), but I'm hoping their machines will accept DXF or SAT files so that curved surfaces will automatically be printed at their best resolution.


Jeff


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* March 19, 2015, 04:12:20 PM
#4
Other articles state that printing speed would be in the "100s of millimeters per hour" range and resolution could be better than 100 microns.

Here's a link to an abstract.  There is more technical info if you register: http://www.sciencemag.org/content/347/6228/1349.abstract

What this means for STL files is that you would have to go into TurboCAD's 'Advanced' ACIS settings and greatly increase file size (by creating more smaller facets), but I'm hoping their machines will accept DXF or SAT files so that curved surfaces will automatically be printed at their best resolution.


Jeff

There's an argument that .stls are already unnecessary: 3D printer software uses slicing algorithms to define the layers and it generally has some utility functions for support structure, orientation and positioning, and they're using .stl as a common model format to slice, but TC and other CAD apps have the capability to slice native files already, TC's section tool is what we've got.   After slicing, the toolpath of the printer head is slightly offset inwards to account for the .3mm or whatever filament diameter, and the slice infill patterns are essentially hatch patterns that determine internal density.  ThYe print file is a generic g-code-like instruction set that tells the printer to "draw" the outline, then "colour it in" for each layer, usually with each layer's hatch offset or normal to preceding and subsequent.   3DSystems, who had a third-party company develop the .stl format when they invented rapid prototyping, also developed a format called .slc, which is  just slice layers, polyline outlines.  Netfabb produces .slc files from .stls, you can define the layer thickness, and it also has a player for progressive animation of your slices, like the CT images that you see in medical shows (or a flip-page booklet comic!), but you'd be hard-pressed to think of how to make a file format for a 3D model simpler, and you could also keep curves in the slice definitions, like more sophisticated CNC post-processors do, although in the orthogonal directions you'd still have step resolution  because they're building layers, but liquids blur that resolution, never mind the file format.

There's a "3D printer" called the Mcor Matrix, that builds layer prototypes out of A4 sheets of plain paper.  Standard 80GSM letter paper comes in 500-sheet reams that are 50 mm thick, ie each sheet is 100 microns thick......Last I heard, the Matrix cost under $25K and apart from paper, consumes specialized tungsten blades and PVA glue.  In the manner of parallel processors, all you have to do to speed things up is to have more machines working concurrently.
« Last Edit: March 19, 2015, 05:37:38 PM by murray dickinson »

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