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bird feeder
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May 18, 2014, 05:46:31 AM
Making on a 3D printer having only two parts that thread together with clear plastic material like Lexan®, it’ll select for the small birds and difficult for the squirrels to raid while hanging down 3-4 feet using garage cable form a horizontal tree limb.  Let’s test it out on the wild life.

Thanks,

Bob

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May 18, 2014, 07:20:12 PM
#1
Bob, are you printing this? Lexan, not so much yet. Can you post a larger image?
Steve

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SGEDESIGNS - - TurboCAD 20.1 Pro Platinum - - WIN7-64 Dell Precision M6700 -- Quadcore i5-3340M 2.7GHz -- 8Gb RAM -- Fire Pro M6000


May 20, 2014, 06:19:51 AM
#2
Granted, the slickness is a result of the molded process normally, while presently the 3D printing is good for proto work exposing inherent weaknesses.  I venture someday a secondary procedure may allow the small steps to meld or fuse into one surface (as in bio-printing) becoming optically smooth possibly a cold diluted chemical bath attacking the parent plastic outermost skin.  Until that blue sky comes about we’ll have to patiently wait I guess.

I’m showing a zoomed-in view of the port hole and roof areas assuming that’s what you’re referring to.  I’m still working on the perch integral with the exterior shell, so that feature is not included.

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May 27, 2014, 09:35:08 AM
#3
There's starting to be commercially-available (well Kickstarter, anyway...) solvent-based ABS print smoothing systems.
https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1809448130/3d-refiner-by-3dprintsexpresscom I imagine you could also solvent-glue parts together and then solvent-smooth the finished assembly. I've used Lockweld's plastic-specific epoxy to join an assembly. Wish I had a safe solvent smoothing system.
Steve

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SGEDESIGNS - - TurboCAD 20.1 Pro Platinum - - WIN7-64 Dell Precision M6700 -- Quadcore i5-3340M 2.7GHz -- 8Gb RAM -- Fire Pro M6000


May 29, 2014, 11:06:49 AM
#4
It seems 3D is on the threshold of adding the luster mainly to save machine time according to the Berkley video.  I have to wonder if spraying the solvent rather than immersion thereby attacking only a thin depth was tried. 

I’d think ending with something truly smooth is reliant on secondary approach due to the rough stepping that’s available today being well beyond what’s required, for instance a medical implant (bacteria) or a telescope mirror (optics) a small surface scratch produces a big issue.

Thanks,

Bob

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